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New Aspirin-like Substances May Provide Safer Way To Fight Heart Disease

Date:
March 18, 2008
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Researchers report the development of a new group of aspirin-like substances that may be safer and as effective as conventional aspirin for fighting heart disease, the leading cause of death in the developed world. Physicians have known for years that daily low-doses of aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid, reduce the risk of developing heart attacks and stroke in some people. However, prolonged use of aspirin can damage the stomach lining, causing bleeding and ulcers that can be life-threatening. A safer form of aspirin is needed, researchers say.

Researchers in Italy report development of a new group of aspirin-like substances that may be safer and as effective as conventional aspirin for fighting heart disease, the leading cause of death in the developed world.

Physicians have known for years that daily low-doses of aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid, reduce the risk of developing heart attacks and stroke in some people. However, prolonged use of aspirin can damage the stomach lining, causing bleeding and ulcers that can be life-threatening. A safer form of aspirin is needed, researchers say.

In the new study, Alberto Gasco and colleagues designed a new form of aspirin by attaching a special chemical structure -- called a nitrooxy-acyl group -- that allows the drug to resist breakdown by stomach acidity while promoting its absorption by the blood.

In laboratory tests using animal models, the new "aspirin-like" substances showed anti-inflammatory activities similar to regular aspirin and caused reduced or no damage to stomach tissue in comparison to equivalent amounts of regular aspirin. Some molecules also reduced platelet aggregation and promoted artery expansion, which are hallmarks of improved heart health, the researchers note.

Journal reference: "Searching for New NO-donor Aspirin-like Molecules: A New Class of Nitrooxy-acyl Derivatives of Salicylic Acid" Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. March 27, 2008. (http//dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm701104f)


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The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "New Aspirin-like Substances May Provide Safer Way To Fight Heart Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080317113914.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2008, March 18). New Aspirin-like Substances May Provide Safer Way To Fight Heart Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080317113914.htm
American Chemical Society. "New Aspirin-like Substances May Provide Safer Way To Fight Heart Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080317113914.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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