Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Risk Of Treatment-resistant Infection Following Facelift Surgery

Date:
March 20, 2008
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
About one-half percent of patients undergoing facelift surgery at one outpatient surgical center between 2001 and 2007 developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, according to a new report.

About one-half percent of patients undergoing facelift surgery at one outpatient surgical center between 2001 and 2007 developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, according to a new report.

Related Articles


MRSA is now a leading cause of infections at surgical sites and in skin and soft tissues, according to background information in the article. It is much more virulent than other forms of staph infection, spreads through tissue more rapidly, is more difficult to control and causes infections that are more expensive to treat and are associated with higher death rates.

Richard A. Zoumalan, M.D., of Lennox Hill--Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital and New York University School of Medicine, New York, and David B. Rosenberg, M.D., also of Lennox Hill--Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, reviewed the charts of 780 patients who underwent facelifts between 2001 and 2007. Of those, five (0.6 percent) developed surgical site infections, and four of those (0.5 percent of the total) tested positive for MRSA. All of the infections occurred in 2006.

"The high proportion of MRSA infections compared with other pathogens is likely attributable to a combination of factors," the authors write. MRSA is an aggressive pathogen more likely to complicate surgical sites, and the antibiotic typically prescribed following surgery is effective against other types of bacteria. "For surgical site infections, the facial plastic surgeon should have a high suspicion for MRSA as the causative pathogen," they continue.

Of the four patients with MRSA-positive infections, two were admitted to the hospital for intravenous antibiotic therapy. Both had potential exposure to MRSA before surgery. One had spent time with her spouse in the cardiac intensive care unit four months prior and the other had frequent contact with her brother-in-law, a cardiologist.

"With the rise of MRSA colonization and infections, facial plastic surgeons performing rhytidectomy [facelift] and other soft tissue procedures may want to consider introducing screening protocols to identify patients who are at increased risk for infection," the authors write. "During preoperative evaluation, a full medical history should include information on possible prior contacts with persons at high risk for carrying MRSA." Other significant risk factors include recently having taken antibiotics or having been hospitalized, contact with health care workers, previous MRSA infections, older age, diabetes, smoking and obesity.

"Because the medical, psychological and cosmetic sequelae of wound infections can be devastating, every appropriate step should be used to prevent wound infections in facial plastic surgery," the authors write. This includes proper hand-washing between patients and preventive courses of antibiotics.

Journal reference: Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2008;10[2]:116-123.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Risk Of Treatment-resistant Infection Following Facelift Surgery." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080317164412.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2008, March 20). Risk Of Treatment-resistant Infection Following Facelift Surgery. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080317164412.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Risk Of Treatment-resistant Infection Following Facelift Surgery." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080317164412.htm (accessed February 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, February 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Hikers Rescued After Fall from Oregon Mountain

Hikers Rescued After Fall from Oregon Mountain

AP (Feb. 1, 2015) Two climbers who were hurt in a fall on Mount Hood are now being treated for their injuries. Rescue officials say they were airlifted off the mountain Saturday afternoon by an Oregon National Guard helicopter. (Feb. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Glasses Augment Reality to Help Visually Impaired

Smart Glasses Augment Reality to Help Visually Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 1, 2015) New augmented reality smart glasses developed by researchers at Oxford University can help people with visual impairments improve their vision by providing depth-based feedback, allowing users to "see" better. Joel Flynn reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flu Season Hitting Elderly Hard

Flu Season Hitting Elderly Hard

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 31, 2015) The CDC says this year&apos;s flu season is hitting people 65 years of age and older especially hard. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 30, 2015) The CDC is urging people to get vaccinated for measles amid an outbreak that began at Disneyland and has now infected more than 90 people. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins