Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Greater Predisposition To Cancer In Those With Certain Homozygous Gene Pairs, Study Suggests

Date:
March 26, 2008
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Persons with a certain type of homozygosity (having two identical copies of the same gene, one inherited from each parent), may have a greater predisposition to cancer, according to a new study.

Persons with a certain type of homozygosity (having two identical copies of the same gene, one inherited from each parent), may have a greater predisposition to cancer, according to a new study.

In previous research, the authors observed a low frequency of germline (those cells of an individual that have genetic material that could be passed to offspring) heterozygosity (possessing two different forms of a particular gene, one inherited from each parent) in cancer patients compared with controls, raising the question whether homozygosity could play a role in cancer predisposition.

"Homozygosity is common in humans and extended homozygote tracts have been described in several studies. Cancer susceptibility genes are also numerous in the genome. These facts together increase the likelihood that homozygosity might occur in the loci [the specific site of a particular gene on its chromosome] of cancer susceptibility genes. One can then hypothesize that germline homozygosity at these loci may somehow contribute to cancer predisposition," the researchers write.

Charis Eng, M.D., Ph.D., of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and colleagues conducted a study to determine the frequency of germline homozygosity in a large series of patients with three different types of solid tumors compared with population-based controls. The study included germline and corresponding tumor DNA, which was isolated from 385 patients with carcinomas (147 breast, 116 prostate, and 122 head and neck carcinomas), and was subjected to genetic analysis.

The researchers found: "Our data derived from 3 different solid tumors, validated in a fourth, demonstrate that high frequencies of germline homozygosity at specific markers are associated with these cancers compared with controls ... Importantly, we were able to independently validate our observations in a different type of solid tumor, lung carcinoma, by showing an increased frequency of germline homozygosity in cancer cases compared with ancestry-matched controls."

"... our observations here should be validated in these solid tumors and explored in other malignancies. If our data can be robustly replicated independently, then germline homozygosity at specific loci as low-penetrance alleles [one of a number of alternative forms of the same gene occupying a given position on a chromosome] predisposing to carcinomas could be taken into account in future cancer risk assessments and management beyond high-penetrance cancer susceptibility genes. Additionally, with further studies and fine structure analyses, it may be possible to use such data to predict the likelihood of loss of heterozygosity in a tumor at specific genomic loci if we knew the relative frequencies of germline homozygosity/heterozygosity at those same loci," the authors write.

Journal reference: JAMA. 2008;299[12]:1437-1445.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Greater Predisposition To Cancer In Those With Certain Homozygous Gene Pairs, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080325163800.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2008, March 26). Greater Predisposition To Cancer In Those With Certain Homozygous Gene Pairs, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080325163800.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Greater Predisposition To Cancer In Those With Certain Homozygous Gene Pairs, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080325163800.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) A disease that has killed more than six million cave-dwelling bats in the United States is on the move and wildlife biologists are worried. White Nose Syndrome, discovered in New York in 2006, has now spread to 25 states. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) That little voice telling you to exercise, get in shape and get healthy is probably coming from your boss. More companies are beefing up wellness programs to try and cut down their health care costs. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) The Food and Drug Administration wants to crack down on the use of e-cigarettes, banning the sale of the product to minors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Michigan Man Sees Thanks to 'bionic Eye'

Michigan Man Sees Thanks to 'bionic Eye'

AP (Apr. 23, 2014) A legally blind Michigan man is 'seeing something new every day' thanks to a high-tech retinal implant procedure. He's one of the first in the country to receive a 'bionic eye' since the federal government approved the surgery. (April 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins