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Actor-robots 'Staff' Part Of New Medical Simulation Training Center

Date:
April 3, 2008
Source:
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Summary:
A new "sim" center contains two fully operational ORs, two intensive care units, high-fidelity computerized mannequins that mimic physiologic and behavioral response to procedures, and 12 examination rooms where students practice routine exams on actors posing as patients with particular complaints and symptoms.

Electronically outfitted mannequins have breath sounds and heart tones, palpable pulses, and a monitor that displays vital signs as students, physicians, nurses and other health care professionals practice everything from bag-mask ventilation, intubation, and defibrillation to chest tube placement and endoscopies.
Credit: Keith Weller

A medical student places a chest tube in a patient lying on an operating table, while another student conducts a colonoscopy. Everything is just as it would be in a real OR or treatment room, except that the patients won't be harmed or complain if mistakes are made -- they're robots.

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These high-tech, electronically outfitted mannequins are equipment in the new $5 million medical and surgical simulation training center at the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center in East Baltimore that opened in March.

The "sim" center contains two fully operational ORs, two intensive care units (ICUs), high-fidelity computerized mannequins that mimic physiologic and behavioral response to procedures, and 12 examination rooms where students practice routine exams on actors posing as patients with particular complaints and symptoms.

The mannequins have breath sounds and heart tones, palpable pulses, and a monitor that displays vital signs as students, physicians, nurses and other health care professionals practice everything from bag-mask ventilation, intubation, and defibrillation to chest tube placement and endoscopies. Computer programs test decision making skills and knowledge on topics such as advanced cardiac life support and trauma management.

"The idea is to get it right before they treat real patients," says the center's director, Elizabeth Hunt, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine.

The troupe of paid professional actors who are trained to portray patients submit themselves to trainees who practice taking histories, performing physical exams, breaking bad news and communicating in a compassionate manner.

"Students can learn the science of medicine in many different ways, but there is only one good way to learn good bedside manner, and that is with real people," says Hunt.

Each of the 15 simulation rooms in the center is equipped with adjustable cameras, microphones, one-way glass for observer viewing, and large flat-screen monitors so students and staff can quickly review their performance while it's still fresh in their minds.

In addition to training students and staff, Hunt says the center also will be used to train medical staff on new equipment, and for teaching emergency medical technicians and paramedics. Outside groups may also be welcome during continued medical education seminars.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "Actor-robots 'Staff' Part Of New Medical Simulation Training Center." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080327172043.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. (2008, April 3). Actor-robots 'Staff' Part Of New Medical Simulation Training Center. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080327172043.htm
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "Actor-robots 'Staff' Part Of New Medical Simulation Training Center." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080327172043.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

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