Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Research Dispels Myth That Cigarettes Make Teenage Girls Thinner, But Smoking May Stunt Growth Of Teenage Boys

Date:
April 1, 2008
Source:
University of Montreal
Summary:
New research shows teenage girls who smoke cigarettes are no more likely to lose weight than girls who don't smoke, dispelling a commonly-held belief. In addition, boys who smoke cigarettes show a decrease in height as well as body mass index (BMI). These findings could have important public health implications, especially since many young girls cite weight control --- or the desire to be runway model thin --- as a reason for taking up smoking.

New research from the Université de Montréal, funded by the Canadian Cancer Society, shows that teenage girls who smoke cigarettes are no more likely to lose weight than girls who don’t smoke, dispelling a commonly-held belief. 

In addition, boys who smoke cigarettes show a decrease in height as well as body mass index (BMI). These findings could have important public health implications, especially since many young girls cite weight control—or the desire to be runway model thin—as a reason for taking up smoking.

The findings, published online in the journal Annals of Epidemiology, are based on data collected from the Nicotine Dependence in Teens study (NDIT). Researchers collected detailed information every three months, over a five-year period, from 1,293 Montreal teens between the ages of 12 and 17.

The research team, led by researcher Dr. Jennifer O’Loughlin at the Université de Montréal, measured the teens’ height, weight, and tricep skinfold thickness. They also gathered information on many other variables, such as levels of physical activity, dietary habits, and teens’ worry about weight. 

The study shows that a boy who smokes 10 cigarettes a day from age 12 to 17 will be about an inch shorter than a boy who does not smoke at all. “We were surprised to find that there was no link between smoking and weight among teen girls because it’s something that many of us take for granted,” said Dr. O’Loughlin.  “We can only hope that girls will think twice about taking up smoking now, if weight loss is one of their goals.” 

Dr. O’Loughlin said teenage boys’ growth may be stunted by smoking because they generally reach puberty later than girls, and are therefore more likely to still be growing when they start smoking. “Maybe teenage boys will see smoking as a bad decision if they dream of being a quarterback or star basketball player,” said Dr. O’Loughlin. 

Dr. Barbara Whylie, CEO of the Canadian Cancer Society, says: “This study has enormous potential to prevent teenagers from taking up smoking and has tremendous implications for public health and tobacco control messaging. We are very proud to have funded such a worthwhile project.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Montreal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Montreal. "New Research Dispels Myth That Cigarettes Make Teenage Girls Thinner, But Smoking May Stunt Growth Of Teenage Boys." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080331135155.htm>.
University of Montreal. (2008, April 1). New Research Dispels Myth That Cigarettes Make Teenage Girls Thinner, But Smoking May Stunt Growth Of Teenage Boys. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080331135155.htm
University of Montreal. "New Research Dispels Myth That Cigarettes Make Teenage Girls Thinner, But Smoking May Stunt Growth Of Teenage Boys." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080331135155.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Study On Artists' Brain Shows They're 'Structurally Unique'

Study On Artists' Brain Shows They're 'Structurally Unique'

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) — The brains of artists aren't really left-brain or right-brain, but rather have extra neural matter in visual and motor control areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) — A recent study links apathetic feelings to a smaller brain. Researchers say the results indicate a need for apathy screening for at-risk seniors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are School Dress Codes Too Strict?

Are School Dress Codes Too Strict?

AP (Apr. 16, 2014) — Pushing the limits on style and self-expression is a rite of passage for teens and even younger kids. How far should schools go with their dress codes? The courts have sided with schools in an era when school safety is paramount. (April 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) — A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins