Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Patient Trial For Virus That Attacks Brain Cancer Cells

Date:
April 16, 2008
Source:
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Summary:
A common, naturally occurring virus that attacks cancer cells but appears to be harmless to normal cells is being studied as a possible treatment for malignant, highly aggressive and deadly brain tumors called gliomas. Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center are among a few in the United States evaluating this experimental therapy.

A common, naturally occurring virus that attacks cancer cells but appears to be harmless to normal cells is being studied as a possible treatment for malignant, highly aggressive and deadly brain tumors called gliomas. Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center are among a few in the United States evaluating this experimental therapy.

Over the course of a lifetime, most adults will be exposed to the virus in its natural state. It commonly infects the lungs and intestines but -- unlike most viruses -- causes few if any symptoms and is usually eliminated by the body within two weeks. But while the reovirus (respiratory enteric orphan virus) may be harmless to normal cells, it can specifically kill certain cancer cells.

Vulnerable cancer cells have a defect in a signaling pathway (the Ras pathway) that controls key cell functions. The reovirus is able to infect and kill cancer cells that have an "activated" Ras pathway, but the virus does not normally come into contact with cancer cells. Researchers at Oncolytics Biotech Inc., of Calgary, Canada, developed a therapeutic drug, REOLYSIN®, from the reovirus and are conducting multicenter clinical trials for a variety of cancers. Cedars-Sinai is participating only in the study on recurrent gliomas, the most common and deadly brain cancers.

Based on the fact that many types of cancer cells have an activated Ras pathway, the company estimates that up to two thirds of all human cancers are susceptible to reovirus induced cell death .

"Although not every glioma cell line has an activated Ras pathway, Ras activation is very common in these malignant brain cancers. In lab tests and animal studies, the reovirus appears to target Ras-activated tumor cells and leave normal cells alone," said neurosurgeon John S. Yu, M.D., director of Surgical Neuro-oncology at Cedars-Sinai's Department of Neurosurgery. Yu is principal investigator of the REOLYSIN® clinical trial at Cedars-Sinai.

According to the protocol of this open-label Phase I and II trial, patients will receive a single treatment of REOLYSIN®, infused over 72 hours and directed into the tumor under sophisticated guidance. Expected length of hospital stay is about five days, and patients' progress will be followed for at least 12 weeks.

Oncolytics published results of preclinical studies in the June 20, 2001 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. In an animal study, mice with gliomas that were treated with a single injection of reovirus survived significantly longer than untreated mice. Complete tumor regression was found in 20 of 23 mice treated with the virus.

In laboratory studies, widespread cell killing was seen in 19 of 24 established human glioma cell lines tested. Reovirus also infected and killed all nine of nine primary glioma cultures taken from brain tumor surgical specimens. "Primary" refers to gliomas originating in the brain, not metastasizing from other locations.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Patient Trial For Virus That Attacks Brain Cancer Cells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080416091004.htm>.
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. (2008, April 16). Patient Trial For Virus That Attacks Brain Cancer Cells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080416091004.htm
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Patient Trial For Virus That Attacks Brain Cancer Cells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080416091004.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) — Pfizer, the world's largest drug maker, cut full-year revenue forecasts because generics could cut into sales of its anti-arthritis drug, Celebrex. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) — Nigerian authorities have shut and quarantined a Lagos hospital where a Liberian man died of the Ebola virus, the first recorded case of the highly-infectious disease in Africa's most populous economy. David Pollard reports Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Newsy (July 29, 2014) — According to a new study, just five minutes of running or jogging a day could add years to your life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Newsy (July 29, 2014) — The Ebola outbreak in West Africa poses little threat to Americans, according to officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins