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Incontinence Treatment: Muscle-derived Stem Cells Prove Effective In Reparing Sphincter Damage To Restore Continence

Date:
May 17, 2008
Source:
American Urological Association
Summary:
Transplantation of muscle-derived stem cells may provide a safe and effective treatment for patients suffering from urinary incontinence following a surgical procedure. Patients with incontinence resulting from iatrogenic sphincter damage may benefit from this therapy.

Transplantation of muscle-derived stem cells may provide a safe and effective treatment for patients suffering from urinary incontinence following a surgical procedure. Two studies presented at the 103rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA), show that patients with incontinence resulting from iatrogenic sphincter damage may benefit from this therapy. Researchers are from Germany and Austria.

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Certain medical procedures, including transurethral resection of the prostate and radical prostatectomy can result in damage to the external urinary sphincter. In one study, a German research team successfully implanted muscle cells grown from tissue from the patients’ deltoid muscles into the damaged sphincter.

One year later, four patients were completely continent and 19 patients had improved from grade III to grade I incontinence. With more than half of the patients experiencing an improvement in continence after four months, the use of muscle-derived cells to repair sphincter damage proved successful. Minor side effects were observed in five patients.

A second study reaffirmed these findings. Using muscle cells from the upper arms of 65 incontinent men who had undergone a prostatectomy, researchers in Austria grew the cells in a laboratory and then implanted them. Patients were evaluated before the surgery to define their level of incontinence and evaluated post-operatively to monitor complications.

Prior to therapy, the mean number of pads used per day was 4.89, and after treatment, the mean number of pads decreased to 1.59. 27.9 percent of patients did not wear pads at all and 43.6 percent reported that they only required a pad for “special occasions.” Only 28.5 percent of patients still required pads.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Urological Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Otto T, Eimer C, Gerullis H: Repair of iatrogenic sphincter damage and urinary incontinence by autologous skeletal muscle derived http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-5347(08)61422-6cells (MDC). J Urol, suppl., 2008; 179: 484, abstract 1414. [link]
  2. Strasser H, Mitterberger M, Dalpiaz O, Kerschbaumer A, Pinggera GM, Frauscher F et al: Transurethral ultrasound guided injection of autologous myo- and fibroblasts in treatment of incontinence in men: 2 year data. J Urol, suppl., 2008; 179: 483, abstract 1413. [link]

Cite This Page:

American Urological Association. "Incontinence Treatment: Muscle-derived Stem Cells Prove Effective In Reparing Sphincter Damage To Restore Continence." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 May 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080515072735.htm>.
American Urological Association. (2008, May 17). Incontinence Treatment: Muscle-derived Stem Cells Prove Effective In Reparing Sphincter Damage To Restore Continence. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080515072735.htm
American Urological Association. "Incontinence Treatment: Muscle-derived Stem Cells Prove Effective In Reparing Sphincter Damage To Restore Continence." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080515072735.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

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