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Dental Implants Preferred Option For Aging Bridges

Date:
May 29, 2008
Source:
American Academy of Implant Dentists
Summary:
Aging dental bridges are a maintenance headache and a recipe for oral-health disaster. They are difficult to floss, often decay, and require replacement with longer bridges. According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry, these bridges to nowhere should be replaced with permanent dental implants.

Aging dental bridges are a maintenance headache and a recipe for oral-health disaster. They are difficult to floss, often decay, and require replacement with longer bridges. According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry (AAID), these bridges to nowhere should be replaced with permanent dental implants.

"Many of us have had the same bridges in our mouths for twenty years or more. They were put in at a time when bridgework was considered to be the norm for replacing missing or compromised teeth," said Olivia Palmer, DMD of Charleston, SC, an associate fellow of AAID and diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology.

"An old bridge is basically worthless for preserving good dental health. In essence, it's a bridge to nowhere," Palmer said. "So why keep a bridge to nowhere? For most patients, implants are a much better treatment alternative because they preserve the bone of the jaw, can be flossed easily, do not decay, and function just like natural teeth. Also, to get implants you don't have to sacrifice healthy teeth, which is required with bridgework," she added.

According to AAID President Jaime Lozada, DDS, director, graduate program, implant dentistry, Loma Linda University, in the last decade prosthodontic treatment planning has changed dramatically because of the acceptance of dental implants as a viable long-term option for replacing missing teeth. "Why consider higher risk procedures when dental implants are more predictable and a better alternative," he said.

Palmer explained that bridges generally fail after 5-10 years as patients have trouble flossing them. "Because these bridges link missing tooth spaces to adjacent teeth, many patients find it very difficult to floss the bridge. Therefore, root surfaces below and around bridgework often decay, if not kept meticulously clean by flossing. It is impossible to repair this marginal decay, so the entire bridge must be replaced," she explained.

Palmer added that, as a result, teeth supporting the old bridge often are lost, requiring insertion of longer bridges that further compromise dentition.

Today highly precise computer guided dental implant surgery has made the procedure faster, highly predicable, long-lasting and 97 percent successful, which is far superior to outcomes with bridges. Palmer, therefore, advises anyone with one or more missing teeth who might consider having a first bridge inserted or replacing an old one to weigh the benefits of implants before getting treatment.

"Many Baby Boomers are coping with dental problems associated with advancing age, and for most that means replacing aging bridgework," said Palmer. "With an estimated two of three Americans having at least one missing tooth, implants are becoming the preferred tooth-replacement option. Implant surgery is one of the safest, most precise and predictable procedures in dentistry," she said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Implant Dentists. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Implant Dentists. "Dental Implants Preferred Option For Aging Bridges." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 May 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080529190042.htm>.
American Academy of Implant Dentists. (2008, May 29). Dental Implants Preferred Option For Aging Bridges. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080529190042.htm
American Academy of Implant Dentists. "Dental Implants Preferred Option For Aging Bridges." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080529190042.htm (accessed July 27, 2014).

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