Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

One In Five Adolescents Are Not Sufficiently Protected Against Meningitis C, Study Suggests

Date:
June 5, 2008
Source:
BMJ-British Medical Journal
Summary:
One in five adolescents aged 11 - 13 years appear to have inadequate protection against meningitis C and a booster dose of vaccine may therefore be needed to sustain protection amongst teenagers, UK study shows.

One in five adolescents aged 11–13 years appear to have inadequate protection against meningitis C and a booster dose of vaccine may therefore be needed to sustain protection amongst teenagers, according to a new study.

Adolescents always used to be considered a group at high risk of contracting meningitis C, but in 1999–2000 the government ran a mass meningitis C immunisation campaign vaccinating everyone aged 1–18 years, and the number of cases dropped dramatically. Since then the vaccine has been part of the routine infant immunisation programme.

Yet studies have shown that the vaccine’s effectiveness in infants drops considerably over time as the level of their antibodies fall. Research has also shown that this doesn’t happen in older children (aged 9–12 years) who are given the vaccine.

Researchers from the University of Oxford examined whether children aged 6–8 years when they were vaccinated as part of the national campaign, are still sufficiently protected. These children are now entering adolescence, a more high risk age. Dr Matthew Snape and colleagues studied the antibody levels in blood samples from 999 adolescents aged 11–20 years who were immunised as part of the 1999–2000 vaccination campaign.

They found that children who were aged 10 years or more when vaccinated, maintained protective levels of antibodies for longer. While the majority, aged 11–20 years, had sufficient levels of antibodies to remain protected, approximately 10% more of those aged 14–20 years had that level of protection compared to those aged 11–13 years. The researchers suggest that one possible cause is maturation of the immune system at around the age of ten.

A meningitis booster jab was introduced for 12 month old children in 2006, but it is currently unknown how effective this will be at providing long-term immunity. However, it is known that over the next five years, a group of children who did not receive a booster, and will therefore not have sufficient levels of antibodies to protect them, will be entering adolescence.

The researchers say that over 20%, ‘a significant minority’, of those aged 11–13 years have inadequate protection against meningitis C and a booster dose of vaccine may be needed to sustain protection against meningitis C amongst teenagers.

These findings emphasise how important age at vaccination is for protection and persistence with conjugate vaccines, say Lucieni Conterno and Paul Heath in an accompanying editorial.

The fact that children in certain age groups might lose their antibodies as they get older, highlights the importance of ongoing high quality surveillance even after the disease seems to have been controlled, they add.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BMJ-British Medical Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Snape et al. Seroprotection against serogroup C meningococcal disease in adolescents in the United Kingdom: observational study. BMJ, 2008; DOI: 10.1136/bmj.39563.545255.AE

Cite This Page:

BMJ-British Medical Journal. "One In Five Adolescents Are Not Sufficiently Protected Against Meningitis C, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080605200501.htm>.
BMJ-British Medical Journal. (2008, June 5). One In Five Adolescents Are Not Sufficiently Protected Against Meningitis C, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080605200501.htm
BMJ-British Medical Journal. "One In Five Adolescents Are Not Sufficiently Protected Against Meningitis C, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080605200501.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are School Dress Codes Too Strict?

Are School Dress Codes Too Strict?

AP (Apr. 16, 2014) Pushing the limits on style and self-expression is a rite of passage for teens and even younger kids. How far should schools go with their dress codes? The courts have sided with schools in an era when school safety is paramount. (April 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) A new study out of Canada says cognitive motor performance begins deteriorating around age 24. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
App Fights Jet Lag With The Power Of Math

App Fights Jet Lag With The Power Of Math

Newsy (Apr. 13, 2014) Researchers at the University of Michigan have designed an app to fight jet lag by adjusting your body's light intake. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Treatment Gaps Endangering Cops, Mentally Ill

Treatment Gaps Endangering Cops, Mentally Ill

AP (Apr. 10, 2014) As states slash funding for mental health services, police officers are interacting more than ever with people suffering from schizophrenia and other serious disorders of the mind. The consequences can be deadly. (April 10) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins