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New Test Makes Cheating With Drugs In Sports Easier To Detect

Date:
June 19, 2008
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
A new mass spectrometry test can help sports anti-drug doping officials to detect whether an athlete has used drugs that boost naturally occurring steroid levels. The test is more sensitive compared to previous alternatives, more capable of revealing specific suspicious chemical in the body, faster to perform, and could be run on standard drug-screening laboratory equipment.

A new mass spectrometry test can help sports anti-drug doping officials to detect whether an athlete has used drugs that boost naturally occurring steroid levels. The test is more sensitive compared to previous alternatives, more capable of revealing specific suspicious chemical in the body, faster to perform, and could be run on standard drug-screening laboratory equipment.

One of the roles of the masculinising hormone testosterone is to increase muscle size and strength. Taking extra testosterone, or taking a chemical that the body can use to create extra testosterone, could therefore enhance an athlete's performance. For this reason taking it is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

The exact level of testosterone varies considerably between different people, so simply measuring total testosterone in an athlete's urine can not show whether he or she has deliberately taken extra. There is, however, a second chemical in the body, epitestosterone, which is normally present in approximately equal proportions to testosterone. Comparing the ratio of testosterone to epitestosterone can then indicate whether testosterone or a precursor has been taken.

The problem is that it is not always easy to measure these two substances, particularly as they are only present in urine at very low concentrations.

A team of scientists the Sports Medicine Research and Testing Laboratory at the University of Utah have developed a test that makes use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This method has incredibly high sensitivity (down to 1 ng/ml) and increases the power with which officials can search for both testosterone and epitestosterone within a sample.

"Our system means that we can determine the testosterone/epitestosterone ratio in a sample with greater confidence, and therefore be in a better position to spot doping violations without falsely accusing innocent athletes," says lead investigator Dr Jonathan Danaceau.

"Not only is the test more sensitive, it is also faster to perform," says colleague Scott Morrison.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jonathan P. Danaceau, M. Scott Morrison, Matthew H. Slawson. Quantitative confirmation of testosterone and epitestosterone in human urine by LC/Q-ToF mass spectrometry for doping control (p n/a). Journal of Mass Spectrometry, Jun 19 2008 DOI: 10.1002/jms.1443

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "New Test Makes Cheating With Drugs In Sports Easier To Detect." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080619090746.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2008, June 19). New Test Makes Cheating With Drugs In Sports Easier To Detect. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080619090746.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "New Test Makes Cheating With Drugs In Sports Easier To Detect." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080619090746.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

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