Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Opioids And Cannabinoids Influence Mobility Of Spermatozoids

Date:
June 24, 2008
Source:
Basque Research
Summary:
There are opioid and cannabinoid receptors in human sperm and these influence the mobility of spermatozoid. This research opens the door to more effective treatment of fertility problems.

A PhD thesis from the University of the Basque Country has concluded that there are opioid and cannabinoid receptors in human sperm and that these influence the mobility of spermatozoid. The research by Mr Ekaitz Agirregoitia opens the door to more effective treatment of fertility problems.

Related Articles


Freshly released spermatozoids cannot achieve fertilisation, they must undergo some changes for this to occur. Amongst other, such changes take place due to receptors situated in the plasmatic membrane (the layer covering the cells) and opioid and cannabinoid receptors are two of these. On coming into contact with these, physiological reactions are generated in the body which are similar to, for example, sedation, analgesia and low blood pressure. Moreover, according to the research undertaken to date, both substances have an influence on the process of fertilisation.

It is known that the consumption of external opiates (heroin, methadone) reduces the mobility of spermatozoids and that external cannabinoids (hachis) causes changes in the reproductive process. Also, the body itself generates internal opioids and cannabinoids, secreted to enable us withstand pain or stress situations, and it is also known that this phenomenon affects the reproduction process.

Despite all this being previously known, there has been no thorough study of the opioid and cannabinoid receptors in the human sperm such as this one, carried out by Mr Ekaitz Agirregoitia Marcos for his PhD thesis, defended at the Faculty of Medicine and Odontology of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and entitled in Basque, Opioide-hartzaileak eta kannabinoide-hartzaileak giza espermatozoideetan espresatzen dira eta haien mugikortasunean eragiten dute (Opioid receptors and cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human spermatozoids and influence their mobility).

The aim was to define this expression and the location of three opioid receptors and two cannabinoid receptors, as well as to analyse the influence of their activity in the mobility of spermatozoids. Mr Agirregoitia has a degree in Biology, specialising in Health Sciences. He is currently working as a substitute lecturer in the Department of Physiology, giving classes in Medical Biophysics and General Physiology. His PhD work was led by Dr. Jon Irazusta Astiazaran from the same Department and was undertaken in collaboration with Dr. Carmen Ochoa of the Euskalduna Clinic and Dr. Manolo Guzmán from the Complutense University in Madrid.

Pinpointing the receptors

This PhD has shown, for the first time, that all the types of opioid and cannabinoid receptors are found in human sperm. To date, only the MU opioid receptor has been found in equine sperm, and the presence in human sperm of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor was only discovered this year. Dr. Agirregoitia has used a number of techniques to find three opioid receptors (DELTA, KAPPA and MU) and two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) in the human sperm. According to his research, all these are found at the head, the middle and the tail of the spermatozoids.

How is mobility influenced?

After defining the expression and location of the opioid and cannabinoid receptors, Dr. Agirregoitia initiated an analysis of their influence on the mobility of the spermatozoids. These receptors act like a kind of lock catch mechanism to which the opioids and cannabinoids attach themselves. Some of these substances (agonists) are capable of activating the cells, just like a key opening a lock. Others (antagonists), although fitting perfectly into the “locks”, are not capable of opening them and have the effect of blocking the receptor. Mr Agirregoitia studied both processes, incubating human sperm with agonist and antagonist synthetic substances to this end.

From this PhD thesis, presented at the UPV/EHU, it was concluded that, for the movement of the spermatozoids to be maintained, a minimum number of DELTA receptors must remain active. On the other hand, it is pointed out that the activation of the MU opioid receptor inhibits the mobility of the spermatozoids, i.e. it causes them to slow down. Finally, the PhD concludes that the KAPPA opioid receptor participates in another process which has nothing to do with mobility.

As regards the cannabinoid system, the activation of the CB1 y CB2 receptors causes the percentage of spermatozoids with rapid and progressive mobility to be reduced. Even so, as a consequence of the activation of the CB1 receptor, the number of slow spermatozoids rises, while the activation of CB2 increases the number of spermatozoids with progressive but slow movement.

The most effective diagnoses and treatments

It is known that opiods and cannabinoids regulate the function of reproduction through the central nervous system and, according to this PhD thesis, they are also able to control the process through the receptors located in the spermatozoids themselves. Thus, the type and concentration of internal opioids and cannabinoids found in the spermatozoid on its way to the egg will condition its mobility.

This work opens the door – in the medium to long term – to the diagnosis and treatment of numerous pathologies. For example, an analysis of the components of the system of opioid and cannabinoid receptors would enable us to better understand fertility problems due to currently unknown causes, exhibited by both spermatozoids as well as the female reproductive organ. Also, when designing treatment aimed at fomenting the mobility of spermatozoids, it will enable the prescribing of treatment that activates or inhibits the appropriate receptor in order to benefit the process of fertilisation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Basque Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Basque Research. "Opioids And Cannabinoids Influence Mobility Of Spermatozoids." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080620115953.htm>.
Basque Research. (2008, June 24). Opioids And Cannabinoids Influence Mobility Of Spermatozoids. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080620115953.htm
Basque Research. "Opioids And Cannabinoids Influence Mobility Of Spermatozoids." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080620115953.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Academic Scandal Shocks UNC

Academic Scandal Shocks UNC

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) — A scandal involving bogus classes and inflated grades at the University of North Carolina was bigger than previously reported, a new investigation found. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Working Mother Getaway: Beaches Turks & Caicos

Working Mother Getaway: Beaches Turks & Caicos

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) — Feast your eyes on this gorgeous family-friendly resort. Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com
What Your Favorite Color Says About You

What Your Favorite Color Says About You

Buzz60 (Oct. 22, 2014) — We all have one color we love to wear, and believe it or not, your color preference may reveal some of your character traits. In celebration of National Color Day, Krystin Goodwin (@kyrstingoodwin) highlights what your favorite colors may say about you. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) — A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins