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'Directed Thinking' Increases Time Spent Exercising

Date:
June 25, 2008
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
A new study shows how "directed thinking" led to an increase in exercise and fitness in sedentary college students.
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FULL STORY

“Directed Thinking” involves asking people to think about information related to a topic that they already know which directs them to action. A study in the Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research shows how “directed thinking” led to an increase in exercise performance and fitness in sedentary college students.

Laura L. Ten Eyck, PhD, Dana P. Gresky, PhD, and Charles G. Lord, PhD, studied 61 college students who did not exercise on a regular basis or exercised inconsistently. Researchers asked students to think about ideas that fell into either the “reasons” category or the “actions” category. For example, some participants were asked to list the reasons why they should increase the performance of a target cardiovascular exercise they had previously selected, such as to be healthier or lose weight. Other participants were asked to list actions they could take to increase exercise performance, such a joining a gym or working out with a friend.

Having the students for eight weeks bring to mind and list actions they could take to increase exercise performance led to an increase in exercise and improved cardiovascular fitness. However, having students repeatedly bring to mind the reasons why they should do the target exercise did not increase time spent exercising.

“Our results suggest that people who are out of shape and at risk for serious health problems may be able to think their own way out of their unhealthy lifestyle and onto the path towards better physical fitness,” the authors conclude. “It could change the way that people think about motivating themselves and others.”


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Laura L. Ten Eyck, Dana P. Gresky, Charles G. Lord. Effects of Directed Thinking on Exercise and Cardiovascular Fitness. Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, 2007; 12 (3-4): 237 DOI: 10.1111/j.1751-9861.2008.00023.x

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Wiley-Blackwell. "'Directed Thinking' Increases Time Spent Exercising." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080624110909.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2008, June 25). 'Directed Thinking' Increases Time Spent Exercising. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080624110909.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "'Directed Thinking' Increases Time Spent Exercising." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080624110909.htm (accessed July 2, 2015).

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