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New Form Of Energy-Transfer Processes: Atomic Tug Of War

Date:
July 3, 2008
Source:
University of Bristol
Summary:
A new form of energy-transfer processes, reported in Nature may have implications for the study of reactions going on in the atmosphere, and even for those occurring in the body.

Still of Trajectory 3: forward scattering, clockwise rotation.
Credit: Eckart Wrede

A new form of energy-transfer, reported in Nature may have implications for the study of reactions going on in the atmosphere, and even for those occurring in the body.

Imagine a simple molecule consisting of two atoms as being like two balls attached together by a spring. If an incoming atom strikes one side of the molecule, the spring compresses and you would expect the molecule to jump backwards -- remember Newton's cradle?

However, research by Dr Stuart Greaves in the Chemistry department at the University of Bristol, suggests that, contrary to expectations, in certain conditions the molecule jumps forwards, not backwards.

Greaves and his colleagues studied fast hydrogen atoms colliding with supersonically cooled deuterium-deuterium molecules. On the occasions when the collision did not result in a chemical reaction, the hydrogen atoms scatter.

In these 'inelastic' processes, the scattering of the hydrogen atom is normally backwards. But in this case, the team found that the inelastic scattering process led mainly to forward scattering -- the opposite of what was expected.

Stuart Greaves said: "The reaction under study is the simplest chemical reaction possible and yet it still continues to surprise us, even after 80 years of scientific investigation. Our work provides another vital piece of the jigsaw for understanding the mechanics of chemical reactions, such as those going on in the atmosphere."

The explanation of what is happening is that even if the hydrogen atom flies past the deuterium-deuterium molecule in a 'grazing collision', this can tug on the deuterium atom nearest to it, thereby extending the bond connecting the two deuterium atoms, which causes the molecule to move forwards.

The authors suggest that this 'tug-of-war' behaviour may come into play whenever a strong attraction develops between the colliding partners, just as the gravitational effect of the Moon 'pulls' the water on Earth towards it.

This work has only been possible due to the trans-Atlantic collaboration between theory -- Stuart Greaves at Bristol University and Eckart Wrede at Durham University -- and experiments, conducted by Professor Richard Zare's group at Stanford University in California.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bristol. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Stuart J. Greaves, Eckart Wrede, Noah T. Goldberg, Jianyang Zhang, Daniel J. Miller & Richard N. Zare. Vibrational excitation through tug-of-war inelastic collisions. Nature, 3 July, Vol 454, p. 88

Cite This Page:

University of Bristol. "New Form Of Energy-Transfer Processes: Atomic Tug Of War." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080702132209.htm>.
University of Bristol. (2008, July 3). New Form Of Energy-Transfer Processes: Atomic Tug Of War. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080702132209.htm
University of Bristol. "New Form Of Energy-Transfer Processes: Atomic Tug Of War." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080702132209.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

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