Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers Enhance Lithography Light Sources

Date:
July 14, 2008
Source:
University of California - San Diego
Summary:
A breakthrough discovery may help aid the semiconductor industry's quest to squeeze more information on chips to accelerate the performance of electronic devices.

Mark Tillack, a UC san Diego mechanical and aerospace engineering scientist, is developing laser-produced light sources for next generation Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of California - San Diego

A breakthrough discovery at UC San Diego may help aid the semiconductor industry’s quest to squeeze more information on chips to accelerate the performance of electronic devices. So far, the semiconductor industry has been successful in itsconsistent efforts to reduce feature size on a chip. Smaller features mean denser packing of transistors, which leads to more powerful computers, more memory, and hopefully lower costs.

Related Articles


In an effort to help create faster, better and cheaper light sources for chips, UC San Diego researchers, in collaboration with Cymer, Inc., are developing laser-produced light sources for next generation Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL).

The researchers, led by mechanical and aerospace engineering scientist Mark Tillack, filed a patent in May 2008for their latest discovery indicating that longer pulse lengths can provide similar performance as short pulse lengths. Tillack and his team found that employing a long pulse in a CO2 laser system used in an EUVL source could make the system significantly more efficient, simpler, and cheaper compared to that using a shorter pulse. Their research findings were recently published in Applied Physics Letters.

Today’s semiconductor companies are diligently working on developing EUVL as the leading candidate for next generation lithography tools to produce microchips with features of 32 nanometers or less. While great progress has been made in this field,several challenges still exist to cost effectively field EUVL in high volume manufacturing. Nowadays, the light source in semiconductor lithography is applied directly from a laser through a mask to a wafer. In EUVL, a laser is used to produce extreme ultraviolet light that is sent to a mask and then the wafer. This indirect process is more inefficient, and could require a very large and very expensive laser source, Tillack said.

“CO2 lasers, which we use in our lab, have two advantages – they are inherently cheaper to build and operate, and they give better conversion efficiency from the laser to EUV light,” he said. “Our discovery that long pulses work well enough means that the CO2 laser system can be built and operated more cheaply.”

Tillack pointed to possible future applications for EUVL, such as flash memory chips, which will become denser and denser.“Imagine in the future being able to make a 200 gigabyte flash disk memory stick cheaply,” he said. “EUVL could make hard disks obsolete”.

“We didn’t know how to make a powerful source of light in this part of the spectrum before,” added Tillack,also an associate director of the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering’s Center for Energy Research. “We might be opening new avenues for advanced light sources. We need to continue our research and begin to look at other possible applications.”

Tillack's EUVL workwas supported by Cymer Inc. and by the University of California under the UC Industry-University Cooperative Research Program.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - San Diego. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of California - San Diego. "Researchers Enhance Lithography Light Sources." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080709163756.htm>.
University of California - San Diego. (2008, July 14). Researchers Enhance Lithography Light Sources. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080709163756.htm
University of California - San Diego. "Researchers Enhance Lithography Light Sources." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080709163756.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Building Google Into Cars

Building Google Into Cars

Reuters - Business Video Online (Dec. 19, 2014) Google's next Android version could become the standard that'll power your vehicle's entertainment and navigation features, Reuters has learned. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AP Review: Nikon D750 and GoPro Hero 4

AP Review: Nikon D750 and GoPro Hero 4

AP (Dec. 19, 2014) What to buy an experienced photographer or video shooter? There is some strong gear on the market from Nikon and GoPro. The AP's Ron Harris takes a closer look. (Dec. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) A double-amputee makes history by becoming the first person to wear and operate two prosthetic arms using only his mind. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 18, 2014) The U.S. Navy unveils an underwater device that mimics the movement of a fish. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins