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Oral Administration Of Lactobacillus From Breast Milk May Treat Common Infection In Lactating Mothers

Date:
August 26, 2008
Source:
American Society for Microbiology
Summary:
Oral administration of lactobacillus strains found in breast milk may provide an alternative method to antibiotics for effectively treating mastitis, a common infection that occurs in lactating mothers say researchers from Spain.

Oral administration of lactobacillus strains found in breast milk may provide an alternative method to antibiotics for effectively treating mastitis, a common infection that occurs in lactating mothers say researchers from Spain.

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They report their findings in the August 2008 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

Mastitis, inflammation of one or more lobules of the mammary gland, occurs in anywhere from 3 to 33% of lactating mothers and of those incidences 75 to 95% are diagnosed within the first twelve weeks postpartum. While Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are considered to be the main infectious agents associated with mastitis, increased multi-drug resistance to antibiotics are making such infections difficult to treat, therefore prompting researchers to explore alternative treatment options.

In prior studies researchers collected lactobacillus strains from the breast milk of healthy mothers and found the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarious to be comparable to strains currently used in commercial probiotic products. Here the researchers randomly divided twenty women diagnosed with staphylococcal mastitis into two groups, a probiotic group and a control. The probiotic group received the same daily dosage of L. salivarius and L. gasseri for four weeks, both of which were originally isolated from breast milk.

Results showed that on day zero staphylococcal counts in both groups were similar. At day fourteen women in the probiotic group were displaying no clinical signs of mastitis, but infection in the control group persisted. Finally, on day thirty the staphylococcal count was lower in the probiotic group and L. salivarius and L. gasseri were detected in milk samples from six of the ten women.

"In conclusion, L. salivarius CECT5713 and L. gasseri CECT5714 appear to be an efficient alternative for the treatment of lactational infectious mastitis during lactation," say the researchers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Microbiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. E. Jimenez, L. Fernandez, A. Maldonado, R. Martin, M. Olivares, J. Xaus, J.M. Rodriguez. Oral Administration of Lactobacillus Strains Isolated from Breast Milk as an Alternative for the Treatment of Infectious Mastitis during Lactation. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2008; 74 (15): 4650 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.02599-07

Cite This Page:

American Society for Microbiology. "Oral Administration Of Lactobacillus From Breast Milk May Treat Common Infection In Lactating Mothers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 August 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080825203330.htm>.
American Society for Microbiology. (2008, August 26). Oral Administration Of Lactobacillus From Breast Milk May Treat Common Infection In Lactating Mothers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080825203330.htm
American Society for Microbiology. "Oral Administration Of Lactobacillus From Breast Milk May Treat Common Infection In Lactating Mothers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080825203330.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

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