Science News
from research organizations

New Sensory Devices To Aid Parkinson’s And Stroke Patients Under Development

Date:
September 2, 2008
Source:
Queen's University, Belfast
Summary:
People who have suffered a stroke or who have been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, could benefit from new research.
Share:
         
Total shares:  
FULL STORY

People who have suffered a stroke or who have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, could benefit from new research at Queen’s University Belfast.

Dr Cathy Craig from Queen’s School of Psychology is researching the development of new sensory devices for those who normally have difficulty controlling their movements.

Dr Craig said: “Being able to control the speed of our movements is key to survival. For some people areas of the brain used to generate this type of control are damaged (e.g. by a stroke) or are poorly developed (e.g. putting a ball in golf).

“By using engineered timing aids that will provide sensory information that can be picked up through our eyes, ears or sense of touch, the brain can learn to guide these types of movements in a more controlled way.

“We hope that the findings from this project will help us further understand how we control our movements and will provide a tangible way of helping those who have difficulty controlling their movements in a wide range of applications.”

Using a fund of €7.5 billion over seven years, the ERC expects projects such as Dr Craig’s to bring about new and unpredictable scientific discoveries which will form the basis of new industries and social innovations.

Dr Craig’s project, known as TEMPUS-G (Temporal Enhancement of Motor Performance Using Sensory Guides), will use theories about how the brain controls self-paced movements as a basis for designing sensory devices (visual, acoustic and haptic). The potential beneficial effects of using these devices will be tried and tested in both a sports (e.g. golf) and rehabilitative (e.g. stroke) context.

Dr Craig will also be using the expertise of colleagues across the University in her project, including those in the School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the School of Music and Sonic Arts.

The work is being funded by a grant of €860,924 from the European Research Council.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queen's University, Belfast. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Queen's University, Belfast. "New Sensory Devices To Aid Parkinson’s And Stroke Patients Under Development." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080901090845.htm>.
Queen's University, Belfast. (2008, September 2). New Sensory Devices To Aid Parkinson’s And Stroke Patients Under Development. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080901090845.htm
Queen's University, Belfast. "New Sensory Devices To Aid Parkinson’s And Stroke Patients Under Development." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080901090845.htm (accessed April 27, 2015).

Share This Page:


Mind & Brain News
April 27, 2015

Latest Headlines
updated 12:56 pm ET