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Saturn's Radio Broadcasters Mapped In 3D For First Time

Date:
October 5, 2008
Source:
Europlanet
Summary:
Observations from NASA's Cassini spacecraft have been used to build, for the first time, a 3-D picture of the sources of intense radio emissions in Saturn's magnetic field, known as the Saturn Kilometric Radiation.

Projection of radio sources onto plane perpendicular to line between Cassini and the centre of Saturn.
Credit: Image courtesy of Europlanet

Observations from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have been used to build, for the first time, a 3D picture of the sources of intense radio emissions in Saturn’s magnetic field, known as the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR).

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The SKR radio emissions are generated by high-energy electrons spiralling around magnetic field lines threaded through Saturn’s auroras. Previous Cassini observations have shown that the SKR is closely correlated with the intensity of Saturn’s UV aurora and the pressure of the solar wind.

The measurements were made using Cassini’s Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment. The results will be presented by Dr Baptist Cecconi, of LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, at the European Planetary Science Congress on the 23rd of September.

“The animation shows radio sources clustered around curving magnetic field lines. Because the radio signals are beamed out from the source in a cone-shape, we can only detect the sources as Cassini flies through the cone. When Cassini flies at high altitudes over the ring planes, we see the sources clearly clustered around one or two field lines. However, at low latitudes we get more refraction and so the sources appear to be scattered,” said Dr Cecconi.

The model found that the active magnetic field lines could be traced back to near-polar latitudes degrees in both the northern and southern hemisphere. This matches well with the location of Saturn’s UV aurora.

“For the purposes of the model, we’ve imagined a screen that cuts through the middle of Saturn, set up at right-angles to the line between Cassini and the centre of the planet. We’ve mapped the footprints of the radio sources projected onto the screen, which tilts as Cassini moves along its orbital path and its orientation with respect to Saturn changes. We’ve also traced the footprints of the magnetic field lines back to the cloud tops of Saturn,” said Dr Cecconi.

Although there were some minor differences between emissions in the northern and southern hemispheres, the emissions were strongest in the western part of Saturn’s sunlit hemisphere. This area corresponds to a region of Saturn’s magnetopause where electrons are thought to be accelerated by the interaction of the solar wind and Saturn’s magnetic field.

The observations were made over a 24-hour period during Cassini’s flyby of Saturn on 25-26th September 2006. This flyby was chosen because Cassini would approach from the southern hemisphere and swoop out from the northern hemisphere, allowing the instruments to take measurements from about 30 degrees below to about 30 degrees above the equatorial plane.

Animation available at: http://www.lesia.obspm.fr/~cecconi/files/EPSC-SKR-movie.mp4


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Europlanet. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Europlanet. "Saturn's Radio Broadcasters Mapped In 3D For First Time." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 October 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080923084543.htm>.
Europlanet. (2008, October 5). Saturn's Radio Broadcasters Mapped In 3D For First Time. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080923084543.htm
Europlanet. "Saturn's Radio Broadcasters Mapped In 3D For First Time." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080923084543.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

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