Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Radio-frequency Identification Reduces Specimen Labeling Errors

Date:
October 13, 2008
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
With a long-held commitment to continuously improving the quality and safety of patient care, Mayo Clinic researchers are recommending a new technologically-advanced labeling system aimed at reducing specimen labeling errors in a high-volume gastrointestinal endoscopy center.

With a long-held commitment to continuously improving the quality and safety of patient care, Mayo Clinic researchers are recommending a new technologically-advanced labeling system aimed at reducing specimen labeling errors in a high-volume gastrointestinal endoscopy center. That conclusion is based on the results of a study they are presenting at the 2008 American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) Annual Meeting.

"The Gastroenterology and Colorectal Surgery outpatient endoscopy unit at our facility yields over 30,000 specimen bottles that are sent for pathologic review every year," says Dawn Francis, M.D., the lead author and a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic. "Over the past several years, Mayo Clinic identified some issues with mislabeling of tissue specimens in the units. Most labeling errors have been due to either the wrong patient label or no label being affixed to a specimen bottle. As a result, a quality improvement initiative was created to reduce the number of specimen-labeling errors."

This study used a technology, radio-frequency identification (RFID), to track biopsy specimens taken during gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures and to automate identification. An RFID tag can be applied to or incorporated into an object so that it can be identified by using radio waves. Radio-frequency identification is used in other settings, such as libraries or passports, as an automated tracking system. This is its first application to track specimens in a health care setting.

Researchers reviewed the number of specimen-labeling errors for the first three months of 2007, prior to the implementation of the initiative and the first three months of 2008, six months after the initiation of RFID specimen labeling. Specimen-labeling errors were categorized as Class 1 (only typographical with no potential patient care consequences), Class 2 (minor error, unlikely to have patient care consequences) and Class 3 (significant error that has the potential to detrimentally impact patient care).

The endoscopy unit sent 8,231 specimen bottles to the pathology laboratory for evaluation during the first three months of 2007, and 8,539 bottles in the first three months of 2008. Compared to 765 errors in 2007, only 47 errors were noted in 2008. Overall, serious errors were low anyway, but the new labeling system reduced such errors even more, minimizing risk for patients. The two incidents of Class 3 errors in the first quarter of 2008 were recognized and corrected prior to specimen processing in the pathology laboratory.

"This system has provided us a great opportunity to enhance safety and quality efforts in specimen management. The RFID system has allowed us to reduce the number of data transcription points during the handling of these very important specimens," says Schuyler Sanderson, M.D., a pathologist involved in the research study. "It appears that this quality initiative, with emphasis on correct data creation and transcription point reduction, has the potential to significantly improve our clinical practice."

Previous Mayo Clinic research on RFID technology revealed that human error decreased dramatically as multiple checkpoints in specimen handling were eliminated.

Also involved in the study was Mayo Clinic researcher Shalini Prabhakar, M.B.A.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Radio-frequency Identification Reduces Specimen Labeling Errors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 October 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081006092524.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2008, October 13). Radio-frequency Identification Reduces Specimen Labeling Errors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081006092524.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Radio-frequency Identification Reduces Specimen Labeling Errors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081006092524.htm (accessed April 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, April 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) Nine-month-old Wyatt Scott was born with a rare disorder called congenital trismus, which prevents him from opening his mouth. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins