Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Statins Show Promise For Blood Clot Prevention

Date:
October 29, 2008
Source:
American College of Chest Physicians
Summary:
New research suggests that the use of statins may be associated with a significant reduction in the occurrence of venous thromboembolism, a condition that includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, in patients with solid organ tumors, including breast, lung and colon cancers.

Statins, the class of drugs commonly used for lowering cholesterol, are now showing promise at preventing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or blood clots, an affliction that occurs in nearly 2 million Americans each year.

New research presented at CHEST 2008, the 74th annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), suggests that the use of statins may be associated with a significant reduction in the occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE), a condition that includes DVT and pulmonary embolism, in patients with solid organ tumors, including breast, lung, and colon cancers.

“The results of our research are interesting and thought provoking,” said study author Danai Khemasuwan, MD, Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA. “We hope that our research alerts the scientific community to the potential of statins in reducing VTE.”

Dr. Khemasuwan and his colleagues from Albert Einstein Medical Center evaluated the influence of statins use on the incidence of VTE by reviewing 740 consecutive patients admitted to the hospital between October 2004 and September 2007 with a diagnosis of breast, lung, colon, prostate, stomach, esophagus, pancreas, ovary, kidney, or brain cancer. The occurrence of VTE, risk factors for VTE, and use of statins were recorded. Patients who either used statins for less than 2 months or who never used statins were allocated to the control group.

The mean age of the entire study population was 65 years, 52 percent of subjects were women, and 76 percent were African-American. A total of 26 percent of patients received statins, and the overall incidence of VTE was 18 percent. The analysis revealed that patients receivingstatins were significantly less likely to develop VTE than the control group, with 8 percent of patients receiving statins developing VTE compared with 21 percent in the control group. A logistical regression analysis yielded the same results irrespective of smoking, documented metastatic disease, current use of chemotherapy, immobilization, and use of aspirin.

Although the authors could not draw conclusions about the cause and effect relationship between statins and VTE, Dr. Khemasuwan feels the data are promising. “If the results of our study are confirmed in a prospective randomized, controlled trial, this could have very significant implications for the medical community.”

“Recent studies have examined the use of statins for the prevention of lung disease, stroke, and other neurologic disorders,” said James A. L. Mathers, Jr., MD, FCCP, President of the American College of Chest Physicians. “The results of this study are promising and suggest a potential role for statins in the prevention of thromboembolism.”

CHEST 2008 is the 74th annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians, held October 25-30 in Philadelphia, PA.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Chest Physicians. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American College of Chest Physicians. "Statins Show Promise For Blood Clot Prevention." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 October 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081027101336.htm>.
American College of Chest Physicians. (2008, October 29). Statins Show Promise For Blood Clot Prevention. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081027101336.htm
American College of Chest Physicians. "Statins Show Promise For Blood Clot Prevention." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081027101336.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins