Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Artificial Pancreas Could Revolutionize Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes

Date:
October 30, 2008
Source:
University of Virginia
Summary:
Researchers across the globe are testing a computerized, subcutaneous system that could one day transform the way Type 1 diabetics manage their disease.

Researchers at the University of Virginia and sites across the globe are testing a computerized, subcutaneous system that could one day transform the way Type 1 diabetics manage their disease.

Related Articles


U.Va. investigators have completed the first of several international artificial pancreas clinical trials to test an individually-"prescribed" control algorithm, which regulates blood glucose levels in Type 1 diabetics. U.Va.is one of seven centers worldwide funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to perform the novel closed-loop computer simulation of the human metabolic system.

Since late June, researchers have successfully tested the new system on five patients at the U.Va. Health System. Three additional patients participated in a parallel study at the University of Padova, Italy.

"Our initial results are very encouraging," said Boris Kovatchev, associate professor of psychiatry and neurobehavioral sciences and of systems and information engineering, who is leading U.Va.'s research team. "The system entirely maintained the patients' blood glucose levels, and the algorithm achieved excellent overnight control without any incidence of hypoglycemia."

Kovatchev, internationally known for his expertise in applying advanced computational methods to diabetes research, was one of the scientists who developed the system's novel algorithm, which allows for personalized treatment for each patient. By linking patients' glucose monitors with their insulin pumps, the "smart" program automatically regulates the amount of insulin a patient needs.

Researchers were granted Food and Drug Administration approval, based solely on computer simulation experiments, to test the artificial pancreas in humans, without any prior animal trials. The action cut research development time from several years to six months.

"This artificial pancreas could one day greatly improve the current methods of self-treatment for Type 1 diabetes," Kovatchev said. "Instead of a patient having to measure his or her blood sugar with a glucose meter several times a day and self-administer insulin injections, this system would continuously regulate the patient's blood glucose, much like the way a non-diabetic's pancreas functions."

Complete results from the initial clinical trials at the U.Va.Health System, the University of Padova and the University of Montpellier, France, are expected by the end of 2008.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Virginia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Virginia. "Artificial Pancreas Could Revolutionize Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 October 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081029104717.htm>.
University of Virginia. (2008, October 30). Artificial Pancreas Could Revolutionize Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081029104717.htm
University of Virginia. "Artificial Pancreas Could Revolutionize Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081029104717.htm (accessed November 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The MelaFind device is a pain-free way to check suspicious moles for melanoma, without the need for a biopsy. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battling Multiple Myeloma

Battling Multiple Myeloma

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The answer isn’t always found in new drugs – repurposing an ‘old’ drug that could mean better multiple myeloma treatment, and hope. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) New information that is linking chronic inflammation in the prostate and prostate cancer, which may help doctors and patients prevent cancer in the future. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) Blood transfusions are proving crucial to young sickle cell patients by helping prevent strokes, even when there is no outward sign of brain injury. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins