Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Screening For Colorectal Cancer Detects Unrecognized Disease

Date:
December 3, 2008
Source:
BMJ-British Medical Journal
Summary:
Screening for colorectal cancer detects four out of ten cancers and should be carefully designed to be more effective, according to a new study.

Screening for colorectal cancer detects four out of ten cancers and should be carefully designed to be more effective, according to a study published on bmj.com.

About one in 20 people in the UK develop bowel cancer during their lifetime. It is the third most common cancer in the UK and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Europe and the US.

Previous screening trials have show that faecal occult blood testing can reduce the risk of dying by about 16%. More than 50 countries have introduced screening programmes, but their effectiveness in a public health setting is not clear.

Dr Nea Malila and colleagues from the Finnish Cancer Registry examined whether Finland's national colorectal cancer screening programme could detect unrecognised disease. They studied 106 000 people aged 60󈞬 to test how sensitive screening was in identifying unrecognised disease at three levels—the faecal occult blood test (test to detect small traces of blood in faeces that may indicate disease at an early stage), screening episode, and the national screening programme.

A national screening programme for colorectal cancer began in Finland in 2004 as a public health policy in 22 volunteer municipalities and grew to 161 municipalities by 2006.

Nationally it was decided to split the 106 000 people into two groups—a screening group which received faecal occult blood tests kits by mail and a control group which received the routine health services available in the country.

Anyone whose test indicated blood was contacted so a full colonoscopy could take place.

The researchers found that the sensitivity (accuracy) of the test was 55% when considering cancers that developed after positive tests. The sensitivity from screening episodes was 51% and sensitivity was 38% for the national screening programme.

Roughly, four out of ten colorectal cancers were detected thanks to the organised colorectal cancer screening programme and the researchers concluded that the sensitivity of the Finnish programme was "adequate if relatively low".

The study also presents a model of how to implement a new programme using the principles of experimental design to provide good evidence on effectiveness.

The researchers say: "The sensitivity of the Finnish screening programme for colorectal cancer at the first round was adequate even if relatively low. Programme sensitivity in Finland was sufficient to justify continuation of the programme."

In an accompanying editorial, Joan Austoker and Paul Hewitson from the University of Oxford, say that in addition to programme sensitivity there are other important factors that should be taken into consideration when evaluating a cancer screening programme.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BMJ-British Medical Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

BMJ-British Medical Journal. "Screening For Colorectal Cancer Detects Unrecognized Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081120202504.htm>.
BMJ-British Medical Journal. (2008, December 3). Screening For Colorectal Cancer Detects Unrecognized Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081120202504.htm
BMJ-British Medical Journal. "Screening For Colorectal Cancer Detects Unrecognized Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081120202504.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Costs Keep Mounting

Ebola Costs Keep Mounting

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 23, 2014) The WHO has warned up to 20,000 people could be infected with Ebola over the next few weeks. As Sonia Legg reports, the implications for the West African countries suffering from the disease are huge. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Pleads for Help to Fight Ebola

Liberia Pleads for Help to Fight Ebola

AP (Sep. 22, 2014) Liberia's finance minister is urging the international community to quickly follow through on pledges of cash to battle Ebola. Bodies are piling up in the capital Monrovia as the nation awaits more help. (Sept. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Doctor Says Border Controls Critical

Ebola Doctor Says Border Controls Critical

AP (Sep. 22, 2014) A Florida doctor who helped fight the expanding Ebola outbreak in West Africa says the disease can be stopped, but only if nations quickly step up their response and make border control a priority. (Sept. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Global Ebola Aid Increasing But Critics Say It's Late

Global Ebola Aid Increasing But Critics Say It's Late

Newsy (Sep. 21, 2014) More than 100 tons of medical supplies were sent to West Africa on Saturday, but aid workers say the global response is still sluggish. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins