Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Predicting Visual Recovery: New System Helps Soldiers, Families Cope

Date:
December 2, 2008
Source:
American Academy of Ophthalmology
Summary:
When soldiers sustain eye injuries on the battlefields of Iraq or Afghanistan, one of the first questions families ask military doctors is whether their loved ones will recover good vision. But until Eric D. Weichel, MD, and his colleagues at Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) tackled the issue, there was no standard for predicting visual recovery.

When soldiers sustain eye injuries on the battlefields of Iraq or Afghanistan, one of the first questions families ask military doctors is whether their loved ones will recover good vision. But until Eric D. Weichel, MD, and his colleagues at Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) tackled the issue, there was no standard for predicting visual recovery.

Related Articles


Dr. Weichel's team studied patient records for 523 consecutive eye injuries sustained by 387 US soldiers treated at WRAMC between March 2003 and October 2006. The researchers wanted to know whether a system called the ocular trauma score (OTS), developed for use with non-combat eye trauma by Ferenc Kuhn, MD, was applicable to soldiers' eye injuries. The OTS enables the care provider to calculate the probability that a particular eye trauma patient will obtain a visual range by six months after the injury. This study concluded that the OTS is a valid system for predicting visual acuity outcomes following combat ocular trauma (COT).

"We can now answer many questions about visual prognosis for service members and their families," said Dr. Weichel. "The assessment, treatment, and counseling protocols we developed based on this and related COT studies have been integrated into all phases of eye injury care, from military surgical intensive care units through follow-up and rehabilitation in Veterans' Administration centers."

Dr. Weichel's team collected 201 eye injury-related variables for each soldier studied, as well as measurements of the soldier's best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) taken as soon as possible after the injury and at six months post-injury. Initial BCVA measurements were not available for all subjects since severely injured soldiers (unconscious or intubated) were unable to communicate with doctors about their visual status. The data was then categorized using the OTS. A higher OTS score indicated a higher likelihood that good visual acuity would be recovered.

The visual recovery prognosis was worst for soldiers who sustained injuries to the globe of the eye combined with lacerations to the eyelids or fractures to the bones around the eye, and/or with injuries to the cranial nerves, visual nerves or brain structures. Thirty-three percent of the soldiers had worse than 20/200 vision in one eye, and globe injuries occurred in both of the patient's eyes in 36 percent of the 523 eyes studied. Many soldiers sustained other devastating injuries such as traumatic brain injury (66%) and severe arm/ leg injuries (44%).

The study appears in the Dec. 1 issue of Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Ophthalmology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Ophthalmology. "Predicting Visual Recovery: New System Helps Soldiers, Families Cope." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081202182417.htm>.
American Academy of Ophthalmology. (2008, December 2). Predicting Visual Recovery: New System Helps Soldiers, Families Cope. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081202182417.htm
American Academy of Ophthalmology. "Predicting Visual Recovery: New System Helps Soldiers, Families Cope." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081202182417.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) Conflicting studies published in the same week re-ignited the debate over whether we should be eating breakfast. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) Fears of Ebola are keeping doctors and patients alike away from hospitals in the West African nation of Guinea. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Rising Death Toll, Many Survive Ebola

Despite Rising Death Toll, Many Survive Ebola

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) The family of a Dallas nurse infected with Ebola in the US says doctors can no longer detect the virus in her. Despite the mounting death toll in West Africa, there are survivors there too. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) Is your child ready? Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins