Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Classification Of Spinal Deformity Defines Range Of Normalcy

Date:
December 10, 2008
Source:
University of Cincinnati
Summary:
A neurosurgeon who has spent his career helping people with severe spine problems stand up straight has spearheaded the creation of a new spinal deformity classification system.

Severe scoliosis before surgery (left) and after.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Cincinnati

A University of Cincinnati (UC) neurosurgeon who has spent his career helping people with severe spine problems stand up straight has spearheaded the creation of a new spinal deformity classification system. The system, published this fall in the journal Neurosurgery, defines deformity in relation to the healthy, normal curve of the spine.

“What we’ve done is define spinal deformity and its manifestations throughout the course of a lifetime, based on a systematic approach to the spine, from the head to the pelvis,” says Charles Kuntz IV, MD, an associate professor in UC’s neurosurgery department and director of the division of spine and peripheral nerve surgery at the UC Neuroscience Institute. “Defining deformity with this degree of precision allows us to provide optimal treatment.”

Kuntz, who practices at the Mayfield Clinic, and his co-authors defined spinal deformity by synthesizing published literature that describes normal neutral upright spinal alignment in asymptomatic juvenile, adolescent, adult and geriatric volunteers. The researchers used a total of 38 angles and displacements to define neutral upright spinal alignment, compiling their data over a period of five years.

The spine is a “dynamic organ that changes during the course of a lifetime,” Kuntz says, with normal curves increasing with age.

An estimated 1.5 percent of the population has some degree of spinal deformity, which can take many forms. Abnormal curvatures can occur from side to side, as in scoliosis; they can involve an abnormal forward curve of the spine, known as kyphosis, or hunchback; and they can involve an abnormal posterior curve of the lower spine, known as lordosis, or swayback.

Spinal deformity, depending on its severity, can cause pain, disability and a reduction in quality of life.

Kuntz, whose spinal reconstructions can take as long as 10 to 15 hours over a period of two days, strives for optimal spinal alignment with the finest cosmetic symmetry, even in the most severely disabled patients.

“Some physicians may feel that the result doesn’t have to be perfect,” Kuntz says. “But I do. It’s a big deal when you have a patient who can’t stand up straight, who can’t look you in the eye, who’s embarrassed to go out. It’s a big deal when you help him or her become a person who’s not only attractive to others but also attractive to himself or herself.”

Other co-authors of the spinal classification areLinda Levin, PhD, and David Pettigrew, PhD, of UC; Atiq Durrani, MD, formerly of UC; Christopher Shaffrey, MD, of the University of Virginia; Stephen Ondra, MD, of Northwestern University; and Praveen Mummaneni, MD, of the University of California at San Francisco.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Cincinnati. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Cincinnati. "New Classification Of Spinal Deformity Defines Range Of Normalcy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209154953.htm>.
University of Cincinnati. (2008, December 10). New Classification Of Spinal Deformity Defines Range Of Normalcy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209154953.htm
University of Cincinnati. "New Classification Of Spinal Deformity Defines Range Of Normalcy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209154953.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins