Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Drinkers With Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Are At Greater Risk Of Colorectal Cancer

Date:
January 7, 2009
Source:
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Summary:
Chronic drinking is a known risk factor for colorectal cancer, possibly due to the creation of acetaldehyde by the alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme. New findings show that individuals with a polymorphism of the ADH1C gene produce more acetaldehyde when they drink, which creates a higher risk for colorectal cancer.

Chronic drinking is a risk factor for colorectal cancer, possibly through the effects of acetaldehyde, which is created by the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzyme. This study investigated if a polymorphism of the ADH1C gene that is found in Caucasians may effect acetaldehyde concentrations. Findings confirm ADH1C*1 as a genetic risk marker for colorectal tumors among people who drink more than 30 grams of alcohol per day.

Related Articles


Results will be published in the March issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research and are currently available at Early View.

"In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer clearly stated that chronic alcohol consumption increases the risk for colorectal cancer," said Helmut K. Seitz, professor of internal medicine, gastroenterology and alcohol research at the University of Heidelberg. "This has enormous practical implications since, in many countries, alcohol consumption is high and the prevalence of colorectal cancer is increasing. In other words, one of the leading types of cancers worldwide is further stimulated by alcohol drinking." Seitz is also the study's corresponding author.

"Regular alcohol consumption of about 50 grams or approximately four drinks per day results in a 1.4-fold risk for colorectal cancer compared to non-drinkers," added Mikko Salaspuro, professor at the University of Helsinki, and a specialist in internal medicine and in gastroenterology at the Helsinki University Central Hospital.

Acetaldehyde is the first metabolite of alcohol, both researchers explained. The more acetaldehyde produced, the higher the risk of cellular DNA damage, leading to cancer. While studies of upper digestive tract cancers have strongly implicated exposure to acetaldehyde in saliva, both direct and indirect evidence also implicate the role of acetaldehyde in the cells of the colonic mucosa and cancer development in the colorectum.

For this study, Seitz and his colleagues recruited 173 individuals (138 males, 35 females) with colorectal tumors diagnosed by total colonoscopies, and 788 "control" patients (523 males, 265 females) without colorectal tumors. Whole-blood genotyping was performed on all participants.

"Our results show that individuals who metabolize alcohol to acetaldehyde more rapidly produce more acetaldehyde, and therefore have an increased risk for cancer in the colorectum," said Seitz. "This metabolism is modulated by the activity of an important enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase, which is genetically controlled. Thus, acetaldehyde plays a major role in alcohol-mediated carcinogenesis, and may not only be a carcinogen for the large intestine, but also for the upper aero digestive tract and the breast, as shown by other studies."

Both Seitz and Salaspuro said these findings provide a cautionary tale for certain individuals "Those with other risks for colorectal cancer may want to limit their alcohol intake to less than 30 grams per day, and possibly occasional instead of regular alcohol intake," said Seitz.

"Whether or not they are at higher risk for colorectal cancer," added Salaspuro, "all can decrease their risk if they don't drink, or drink in moderation."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. "Drinkers With Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Are At Greater Risk Of Colorectal Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 January 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081219172035.htm>.
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. (2009, January 7). Drinkers With Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Are At Greater Risk Of Colorectal Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081219172035.htm
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. "Drinkers With Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Are At Greater Risk Of Colorectal Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081219172035.htm (accessed January 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

AFP (Jan. 25, 2015) The World Health Organization&apos;s chief on Sunday admitted the UN agency had been caught napping on Ebola, saying it should serve a lesson to avoid similar mistakes in future. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Newsy (Jan. 24, 2015) Much of the Disneyland measles outbreak is being blamed on the anti-vaccination movement. The CDC encourages just about everyone get immunized. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

AP (Jan. 23, 2015) Public health officials are rushing to contain a measles outbreak that has sickened 70 people across 6 states and Mexico. The AP&apos;s Raquel Maria Dillon has more. (Jan. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) A Boston start-up is developing a wristband they say will help users break bad habits by jolting them with an electric shock. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins