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Trying To Eat Less Becomes More Important To Fend Off Middle-Age Weight Gain

Date:
January 3, 2009
Source:
Brigham Young University
Summary:
Lots of experts disagree over the seemingly obvious notion of keeping weight off by trying to eat less -- a debate that centers on whether the practice backfires, leading to binging and weight gain.

Lots of experts disagree over the seemingly obvious notion of keeping weight off by trying to eat less – a debate that centers on whether the practice backfires, leading to binging and weight gain.

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Now a new study shows that practicing restraint becomes more important with age.

Women who participated in the study had more than twice the risk of substantial weight gain if they did not become more restrained in their eating.

“Some suggest that restrained eating is not a good practice,” said Brigham Young University professor Larry Tucker, the study’s lead author. “Given the environmental forces in America’s food industry, not practicing restraint is essentially a guarantee of failure.”

The study followed 192 middle-aged women for three years and tracked information on lifestyle, health and eating habits. Their analysis revealed that women who did not become more restrained with eating were 138 percent more likely to put on 6.6 pounds or more.

Columbia University researcher Lance Davidson, who was not involved with the analysis, said the findings highlight an important principle of weight management.

“Because the body's energy requirements progressively decline with age, energy intake must mirror that decrease or weight gain occurs,” said Davidson, a research fellow at Columbia’s Obesity Research Center. “Dr. Tucker's observation that women who practice eating restraint avoid the significant weight gain commonly observed in middle age is an important health message.”

Tucker says watching what you eat is not about physical appearance – it’s a direct investment in your health.

“Weight gain and obesity bring a greater risk of diabetes and a number of other chronic diseases,” Tucker said. “Eating properly is a skill that needs to be practiced.”

The study will be published January 2 in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Professor Tucker’s Tips for Better Eating:

  • Record what you eat and how much
  • Put less food on your plate
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables; the food pyramid recommends at least five servings per day

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Brigham Young University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Brigham Young University. "Trying To Eat Less Becomes More Important To Fend Off Middle-Age Weight Gain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 January 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090102163237.htm>.
Brigham Young University. (2009, January 3). Trying To Eat Less Becomes More Important To Fend Off Middle-Age Weight Gain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090102163237.htm
Brigham Young University. "Trying To Eat Less Becomes More Important To Fend Off Middle-Age Weight Gain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090102163237.htm (accessed January 28, 2015).

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