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Physical Disability Brings Marital Happiness

Date:
January 3, 2009
Source:
Brigham Young University
Summary:
A new study finds that the onset of physical disability boosts marital happiness more often than not.

Researcher suggests disability brings more couple interaction.
Credit: Image courtesy of Brigham Young University

A new study finds that the onset of physical disability boosts marital happiness more often than not.

Brigham Young University professor Jeremy Yorgason’s findings – reported in the academic journal Research on Aging – show what happens with couples when one of them loses the ability to perform routine daily activities:

  • Both men and women – regardless of age – reported being happier in their marriage after they themselves became physically disabled.
  • Men whose spouse became physically disabled also experienced greater happiness in their relationship.
  • Women whose spouse became physically disabled reported no overall change in the relationship.

“The numbers show that couples seem to come together when one of them experiences physical limitations,” Yorgason said. “This suggests disability is a two-way street, with some surprising pluses in addition to the minuses people ordinarily expect.”

The results are based on information provided by 1,217 married people randomly selected from around the country. Researchers tracked the lives of the study participants for 12 years. By study’s end, about one-fourth of participants – ranging from 36 to 75 years old – reported that either they or their spouse had permanent physical conditions that restricted activities such as dressing, bathing, eating or working around the house. The researchers zeroed in on this group, comparing their satisfaction in marriage before and after the physical disability occurred.

Exactly why physical limitations boost marital happiness is not fully understood by researchers, Yorgason said. One hint from the new study is that in some cases disability brings more couple interaction.

One expert not involved with the study notes a particular increase in quality time reported by older husbands.

“This suggests that taking on care roles and responsibilities that may be new or more focused than in previous times in their marriage provided the men an opportunity to support and spend more time with their wives and ultimately enhanced their appreciation of their relationship,” said Karen Roberto, director of Virginia Tech’s Center for Gerontology.

Since the onset of physical disability is often stressful, Yorgason recommends couples allow time to adjust and look within their relationship for the “silver lining.”

Alan Booth and David Johnson of Penn State are co-authors on the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Brigham Young University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Brigham Young University. "Physical Disability Brings Marital Happiness." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 January 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090102163830.htm>.
Brigham Young University. (2009, January 3). Physical Disability Brings Marital Happiness. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090102163830.htm
Brigham Young University. "Physical Disability Brings Marital Happiness." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090102163830.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

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