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Surprising New Health And Environmental Concerns About Tungsten

Date:
January 19, 2009
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Surprising new scientific research is raising concerns about the potential health and environmental hazards of tungsten -- a metal used in products ranging from bullets to light bulbs to jewelry -- that scientists once thought was environmentally-benign, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News.

Surprising new scientific research is raising concerns about the potential health and environmental hazards of tungsten — a metal used in products ranging from bullets to light bulbs to jewelry — that scientists once thought was environmentally-benign, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News.

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In the article, C&EN Associate Editor Rachel Petkewich notes that scientists have long held that tungsten is relatively insoluble in water and nontoxic. As a result, the U.S. military developed in the mid 1990s so-called "green bullets" that contain tungsten as a more environmentally-friendly alternative to lead-based ammunition.

But studies now show that tungsten, which is also used in welding, metal cutting, and other applications, is not as chemically inert as previously thought. Some forms of tungsten can move readily though soil and groundwater under certain environmental conditions. Both the U.S. Department of Defense and the Environmental Protection Agency now classify the element as an "emerging contaminant" of concern.

Although scientists think that tungsten seems much less toxic than lead or mercury, they do not know its exact health and environmental effects, the article notes. Scientists have shown that exposure to tungsten can stunt the growth of plants, cause reproductive problems in earthworms, and trigger premature death in certain aquatic animals. But whether or not tungsten can cause chronic health effects in humans, and its mechanism of action, awaits further study, the article suggests.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Unease Over Tungsten. Chemical & Engineering News, January 19, 2009 [link]

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Surprising New Health And Environmental Concerns About Tungsten." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 January 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090119091051.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2009, January 19). Surprising New Health And Environmental Concerns About Tungsten. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090119091051.htm
American Chemical Society. "Surprising New Health And Environmental Concerns About Tungsten." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090119091051.htm (accessed April 24, 2015).

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