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Psychological Interventions May Help Premenstrual Syndrome

Date:
January 19, 2009
Source:
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Summary:
A review article indicates that psychological interventions may help premenstrual syndrome.

A review article which is published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics indicates that psychological interventions may help premenstrual syndrome.

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A group of Canadian investigators conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the efficacy of psychological interventions for premenstrual syndrome.They systematically searched and selected studies that enrolled women with premenstrual syndrome in which investigators randomly assigned them to a psychological intervention or to a control intervention. Trials were included irrespective of their outcomes and, when possible, they conducted meta-analyses.

Nine randomized trials, of which 5 tested cognitive behavioural therapy, contributed data to the meta-analyses. Low quality evidence (design and implementation weaknesses of the studies, possible reporting bias) suggests that cognitive behavioural therapy significantly reduces both anxiety (effect size [ES] = -0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -1.15 to -0.01; number needed to treat [NNT] = 5), and depression (ES = -0.55; 95% CI = -1.05 to -0.05; NNT = 5), and also suggests a possible beneficial effect on behavioural changes (ES = -0.70; 95% CI = -1.29 to -0.10; NNT = 4) and interference of symptoms on daily living (ES = -0.78; 95% CI = -1.53 to -0.03; NNT = 4). Results provide much more limited support for monitoring as a form of therapy and suggest the ineffectiveness of education. Low quality evidence from randomized trials suggests that cognitive behavioural therapy may have important beneficial effects in managing symptoms associated with premenstrual syndrome.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Busse et al. Psychological Intervention for Premenstrual Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 2009; 78 (1): 6 DOI: 10.1159/000162296

Cite This Page:

Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. "Psychological Interventions May Help Premenstrual Syndrome." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 January 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090119091114.htm>.
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. (2009, January 19). Psychological Interventions May Help Premenstrual Syndrome. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090119091114.htm
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. "Psychological Interventions May Help Premenstrual Syndrome." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090119091114.htm (accessed January 27, 2015).

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