Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Durability Of Dental Fillings Improves If The Enzyme Activity Of Teeth Is Inhibited

Date:
February 22, 2009
Source:
Academy of Finland
Summary:
A dental filling is more durable if the enzyme activity of the tooth can be inhibited. Professor Leo Tjaderhane of the Department of Pedodontics, Cariology and Endodontology at the University of Oulu, together with wide international collaborative team, has been developing this method with funding from the Academy of Finland.

A dental filling is more durable if the enzyme activity of the tooth can be inhibited. Professor Leo Tjaderhane of the Department of Pedodontics, Cariology and Endodontology at the University of Oulu, together with wide international collaborative team, has been developing this method with funding from the Academy of Finland.

Related Articles


Composite dental fillings have one problematic feature, in that the bond between the filling and the dental tissue deteriorates over time – in fact, sometimes by as much as 50 per cent in one year. As the bond deteriorates, it may allow bacteria to enter and this brings a high risk of further tooth decay.

Professor Tjäderhane has researched the occurrence of certain enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in the dental tissue and their role in dental conditions. The MMPs break down the extracellular matrix, including collagen, which is a major component of dentin. As a result of international research collaboration, Tjäderhane's research team has shown that human dentin contains the key MMP for breaking down collagen. The bonding of composite resins with dental tissue is based on the use of collagen bonds, and the tooth's own MMPs are responsible in part for the deterioration of the bond over time. By inhibiting the activity of these enzymes, the research team has succeeded in significantly slowing down the deterioration of the bond between dental tissue and a composite filling, and in some cases to prevent deterioration completely.

The best results have been obtained in clinical trials, where deterioration of the bond has been more or less completely prevented. MMP enzyme activity in the tooth can be rapidly and easily inhibited when a filling is put in place by using chlorhexidine, a substance which is already on hand at all dental practices. This means that the research results are immediately applicable in dental care for the best benefit of the patients. The research in question also strongly indicates that MMP inhibitors might help slow down tooth decay. These observations are based only on animal testing so far, so further research on the subject will be needed before pratical applications can be made available.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Academy of Finland. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Academy of Finland. "Durability Of Dental Fillings Improves If The Enzyme Activity Of Teeth Is Inhibited." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090212093658.htm>.
Academy of Finland. (2009, February 22). Durability Of Dental Fillings Improves If The Enzyme Activity Of Teeth Is Inhibited. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090212093658.htm
Academy of Finland. "Durability Of Dental Fillings Improves If The Enzyme Activity Of Teeth Is Inhibited." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090212093658.htm (accessed October 26, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

AFP (Oct. 25, 2014) — An American nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a Liberian patient in Texas has been declared free of the virus and will leave the hospital. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Newsy (Oct. 25, 2014) — A Harvard University Research Team created genetically engineered stem cells that are able to kill cancer cells, while leaving other cells unharmed. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins