Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Prove Graphene's Edge Structure Affects Electronic Properties

Date:
February 25, 2009
Source:
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Summary:
Graphene, a single-atom-thick sheet of carbon, holds remarkable promise for future nanoelectronics applications. However, whether graphene actually cuts it in industry depends upon how graphene is cut, say researchers.

Atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscope image of a nanometer scale piece of graphene on silicon.
Credit: Photo courtesy Joseph Lyding

Graphene, a single-atom-thick sheet of carbon, holds remarkable promise for future nanoelectronics applications. Whether graphene actually cuts it in industry, however, depends upon how graphene is cut, say researchers at the University of Illinois.

Graphene consists of a hexagonal lattice of carbon atoms. While scientists have predicted that the orientation of atoms along the edges of the lattice would affect the material's electronic properties, the prediction had not been proven experimentally.

Now, researchers at the U. of I. say they have proof.

"Our experimental results show, without a doubt, that the crystallographic orientation of the graphene edges significantly influences the electronic properties," said Joseph Lyding, a professor electrical and computer engineering. "To utilize nanometer-size pieces of graphene in future nanoelectronics, atomically precise control of the geometry of these structures will be required."

Lyding and graduate student Kyle Ritter (now at Micron Technology Inc. in Boise, Idaho) report their findings in a paper accepted for publication in Nature Materials online Feb. 15.

To carry out their work, the researchers developed a method for cutting and depositing nanometer-size bits of graphene on atomically clean semiconductor surfaces like silicon.

Then they used a scanning tunneling microscope to probe the electronic structure of the graphene with atomic-scale resolution.

"From this emerged a clear picture that edges with so-called zigzag orientation exhibited a strong edge state, whereas edges with armchair orientation did not," said Lyding, who also is affiliated with the university's Beckman Institute and the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory.

"We found that pieces of graphene smaller than about 10 nanometers with predominately zigzag edges exhibited metallic behavior rather than the semiconducting behavior expected from size alone," Lyding said. "This has major implications in that semiconducting behavior is mandatory for transistor fabrication."

Unlike carbon nanotubes, graphene is a flat sheet, and therefore compatible with conventional fabrication processes used by today's chipmakers. But, based on the researchers' experimental results, controlled engineering of the graphene edge structure will be required for obtaining uniform performance among graphene-based nanoelectronic devices.

"Even a tiny section of zigzag orientation on a 5-nanometer piece of graphene will change the material from a semiconductor into a metal," Lyding said. "And a transistor based on that, will not work. Period."

The Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation funded the work.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kyle A. Ritter, Joseph W. Lyding. The influence of edge structure on the electronic properties of graphene quantum dots and nanoribbons. Nature Materials, 2009; 8 (3): 235 DOI: 10.1038/nmat2378

Cite This Page:

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "Scientists Prove Graphene's Edge Structure Affects Electronic Properties." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090215151623.htm>.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (2009, February 25). Scientists Prove Graphene's Edge Structure Affects Electronic Properties. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090215151623.htm
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "Scientists Prove Graphene's Edge Structure Affects Electronic Properties." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090215151623.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Google Patents Contact Lens Cameras; Internet Is Wary

Google Patents Contact Lens Cameras; Internet Is Wary

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) Google has filed for a patent to develop contact lenses capable of taking photos. The company describes possible benefits to blind people. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Walking, Talking Oil-Drigging Rig

The Walking, Talking Oil-Drigging Rig

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 15, 2014) Pennsylvania-based Schramm is incorporating modern technology in its next generation oil-drigging rigs, making them smaller, safer and smarter. Ernest Scheyder reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dutch Highway Introduces Glow-In-The-Dark Paint

Dutch Highway Introduces Glow-In-The-Dark Paint

Newsy (Apr. 14, 2014) A Dutch highway has become the first lit by glow-in-the-dark paint — a project aimed at reducing street light use. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google Buys Drone Maker, Hopes to Connect Rural World

Google Buys Drone Maker, Hopes to Connect Rural World

Newsy (Apr. 14, 2014) Formerly courted by Facebook, Titan Aerospace will become a part of Google's quest to blanket the world in Internet connectivity. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins