Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Intensively Lowering Blood Glucose In Critically Ill Patients Increases The Risk Of Death, Trial Finds

Date:
March 25, 2009
Source:
The George Institute for International Health
Summary:
The current practice of intensively lowering blood glucose in critically ill patients increases the risk of death by 10 percent. Results of the largest trial of intensive glucose lowering in critically ill patients indicate that international clinical guidelines need urgent review.

The current practice of intensively lowering blood glucose in critically ill patients increases the risk of death by 10%. Results of the largest trial of intensive glucose lowering in critically ill patients published in The New England Journal of Medicine indicate that international clinical guidelines need urgent review.

Related Articles


Intensive blood glucose lowering has been widely recommended and embraced to control hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) which is extremely common among acutely ill patients and linked with serious complications such as organ failure and death. These new findings reveal that current practice to intensively lower blood glucose increases the risk of death among patients in the intensive care unit (ICU).

"Intensively lowering blood glucose in critically ill patients is not beneficial and may be harmful. Based on our findings, we do not recommend pursuing a normal blood glucose level in critically ill patients. We found that intensively lowering blood glucose levels increased a patient's risk of dying by 10%," said Chief Investigator, Professor Simon Finfer from The George Institute for International Health, which is affiliated with the University of Sydney.

Researchers from The Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group, The George Institute for International Health, The Canadian Critical Care Trials Group and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute set out to clarify the target range for blood glucose levels in critically ill patients. They followed 6104 ICU patients in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the USA for up to 90 days to assess whether the treatment would improve patients' chance of survival.

"Previous, smaller research studies have produced conflicting results and overall suggested that intensive blood glucose control didn't affect death rates in critically ill adults. This new study gives us more powerful information, based on this larger study with stronger evidence, we can conclude that targeting very low levels of blood glucose is not safe," said North American Chief Investigator Dr Dean Chittock of Vancouver Coastal Health and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

There are over six million admissions each year to ICU's in North America. The new evidence suggests that current guidelines must be reviewed.

"It's essential that international guidelines reflect this new evidence. Many professional organizations recommend very tight glucose control for ICU patients – they will now need to take this new evidence into consideration and adjust recommendations accordingly," added Dr Chittock.

The study, NICE-SUGAR (Normoglycaemia in Intensive Care Evaluation and Survival Using Glucose Algorithm Regulation) randomly assigned patients to one of two target ranges for blood glucose; an intensive control target (81-108mg/dL; 4.5-6.0 mmol/L) or a conventional control target (180mg/dL; 10.0 mmol/L or less). Control of blood glucose was achieved by the use of an intravenous infusion of insulin.

A unique feature of the NICE-SUGAR study was standardized complex blood glucose management, which was accessed by multiple centres as a computerized algorithm.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The George Institute for International Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. The NICE-SUGAR Study Investigators. Intensive versus Conventional Glucose Control in Critically Ill Patients. N Engl J Med, 2009; DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa0810625

Cite This Page:

The George Institute for International Health. "Intensively Lowering Blood Glucose In Critically Ill Patients Increases The Risk Of Death, Trial Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 March 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090324101604.htm>.
The George Institute for International Health. (2009, March 25). Intensively Lowering Blood Glucose In Critically Ill Patients Increases The Risk Of Death, Trial Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090324101604.htm
The George Institute for International Health. "Intensively Lowering Blood Glucose In Critically Ill Patients Increases The Risk Of Death, Trial Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090324101604.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Scientists in Amsterdam say couples transfer tens of millions of microbes when they kiss, encouraging healthy exposure to bacteria. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Cambridge scientists have unravelled the genetic code of a rare tapeworm that lived inside a patient's brain for at least four year. Researchers hope it will present new opportunities to diagnose and treat this invasive parasite. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Americans Drink More in the Winter

Americans Drink More in the Winter

Buzz60 (Dec. 22, 2014) The BACtrack breathalyzer app analyzed Americans' blood alcohol content and found out a whole lot of interesting things about their drinking habits. Mara Montalbano (@maramontalbano) has more. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins