Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Approach To Treat Bone Loss Might Increase Bone Cancer Risk

Date:
April 1, 2009
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
One approach being considered as a new way to treat osteoporosis is the development of molecules that block the action of proteins that inhibit the Wnt signaling pathway. However, dysregulated Wnt signaling is associated with several cancers.

One approach being considered as a new way to treat osteoporosis is the development of molecules that block the action of proteins that inhibit the Wnt signaling pathway. However, dysregulated Wnt signaling is associated with several cancers.

Further, David Thomas and colleagues, at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia, have now shown that the gene responsible for making the Wnt signaling pathway inhibitor WIF1 is silenced in human osteosarcomas (the most common form of bone cancer) and that its absence in mice accelerated the development of radiation-induced osteosarcomas.

The authors therefore conclude that targeting Wnt signaling pathway inhibitors is likely to increase susceptibility to osteosarcomas.

Thus, both the authors and, in an accompany commentary, Greg Enders, at Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, note that caution is needed before this approach is used in clinical trials to treat patients with bone loss disorders such as osteoporosis.

The research is published in the March 23, 2009, issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.



Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Kansara et al. Wnt inhibitory factor 1 is epigenetically silenced in human osteosarcoma, and targeted disruption accelerates osteosarcomagenesis in mice. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2009; DOI: 10.1172/JCI37175
  2. Greg H. Enders. Wnt therapy for bone loss: golden goose or Trojan horse? Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2009; DOI: 10.1172/JCI38973

Cite This Page:

Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Approach To Treat Bone Loss Might Increase Bone Cancer Risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090324213023.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2009, April 1). Approach To Treat Bone Loss Might Increase Bone Cancer Risk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090324213023.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Approach To Treat Bone Loss Might Increase Bone Cancer Risk." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090324213023.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Might Not Be Out Of Control In U.S., But Coverage Is

Ebola Might Not Be Out Of Control In U.S., But Coverage Is

Newsy (Oct. 2, 2014) Coverage of the lone Ebola patient discovered in Texas has U.S. media in a frenzy — but does the coverage match the reality? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Rhode Island Child With Enterovirus Dies After Infection

Rhode Island Child With Enterovirus Dies After Infection

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 2, 2014) A Rhode Island child hospitalized with Enterovirus D68 has died of a bacterial infection, in what state public health officials say was an unusual and dangerous combination. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
US Hunts Contacts of Ebola Patient, Including Children

US Hunts Contacts of Ebola Patient, Including Children

AFP (Oct. 2, 2014) Health officials in Texas on Wednesday scoured the Dallas area for people, including schoolchildren, who came in contact with a Liberian man who was diagnosed with Ebola in the United States. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Says Losing Sense Of Smell Can Indicate Death

Study Says Losing Sense Of Smell Can Indicate Death

Newsy (Oct. 2, 2014) Researchers found elderly adults with a poor sense of smell are more likely to die within five years. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins