Reference Terms
from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Protein

Proteins are large organic compounds made of amino acids arranged in a linear chain and joined together between the carboxyl atom of one amino acid and the amine nitrogen of another.

This bond is called a peptide bond.

The sequence of amino acids in a protein is defined by a gene and encoded in the genetic code.

Although this genetic code specifies 20 "standard" amino acids, the residues in a protein are often chemically altered in post-translational modification: either before the protein can function in the cell, or as part of control mechanisms.

Proteins can also work together to achieve a particular function, and they often associate to form stable complexes.

Like other biological macromolecules such as polysaccharides and nucleic acids, proteins are essential parts of all living organisms and participate in every process within cells.

Many proteins are enzymes that catalyze biochemical reactions, and are vital to metabolism.

Other proteins have structural or mechanical functions, such as the proteins in the cytoskeleton, which forms a system of scaffolding that maintains cell shape.

Proteins are also important in cell signaling, immune responses, cell adhesion, and the cell cycle.

Protein is also a necessary component in our diet, since animals cannot synthesise all the amino acids and must obtain essential amino acids from food.

Through the process of digestion, animals break down ingested protein into free amino acids that can be used for protein synthesis.

Note:   The above text is excerpted from the Wikipedia article "Protein", which has been released under the GNU Free Documentation License.
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July 4, 2015

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