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TV Shows Convey Mixed Messages About Alcohol Consumption In Youth

Date:
March 27, 2009
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
Efforts to dissuade youth consumption through negative alcohol consumption depictions can be thwarted by portrayals of positive consumption in prime-time television programming. A new study reveals that television series often portray mixed messages about alcohol, but the positive and negative messages were shown differently.

Efforts to dissuade youth consumption through negative alcohol consumption depictions can be thwarted by portrayals of positive consumption in prime-time television programming. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Affairs reveals that television series often portray mixed messages about alcohol, but the positive and negative messages were shown differently.

The research, led by Dale W. Russell and Cristel A. Russell, research scientists at the Prevention Research Center, is based on a content analysis of prime-time television series from the 2004-05 season. The primary, more central, alcohol message was often associated with negative elements such as crime, addiction, or lowered job performance while the secondary, more subtle visual message was almost always associated with positive outcomes, such as having fun or partying. Thus, the positive messages might undermine any negative messages.

“Policymakers and parents need to remain vigilant in monitoring alcohol depictions, especially product placements, given the current environment of self-regulation of the alcohol industry’s marketing/advertising efforts,” the authors conclude.

Because of television’s effect on the audience’s attitudes and behaviors, the prevalence of alcohol messages in the content of television programs raises concerns over their likely impact on audiences, especially young ones. The research team is continuing its efforts to study how such messages are processed and the consequences they have on viewers’ beliefs about alcohol and drinking behaviors.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Russell et al. Alcohol Messages in Prime-Time Television Series. Journal of Consumer Affairs, 2009; 43 (1): 108 DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-6606.2008.01129.x

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "TV Shows Convey Mixed Messages About Alcohol Consumption In Youth." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 March 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090325142515.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2009, March 27). TV Shows Convey Mixed Messages About Alcohol Consumption In Youth. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090325142515.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "TV Shows Convey Mixed Messages About Alcohol Consumption In Youth." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090325142515.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

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