Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Biometric ID: A Quick X-ray Snapshot Of A Person's Knees

Date:
March 28, 2009
Source:
Inderscience Publishers
Summary:
Forget LED thumb-pad identification devices, complex retinal laser scanning, or even computerized iris recognition. The way forward for biometric validation is a quick X-ray snapshot of a person's knees, according to a new report.

Forget LED thumb-pad identification devices, complex retinal laser scanning, or even computerized iris recognition, the way forward for biometric validation is a quick X-ray snapshot of a person's knees, according to a report published in the International Journal of Biometrics.

Lior Shamir of the Laboratory of Genetics, National Institute on Aging, at the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues working with State University of New York at Farmingdale computer engineer Salim Rahimi explain that identification of individuals often requires focusing on unique features such as their face, fingerprints or retina. They explain that a similar identification process with countless applications in building security, at border crossings and elsewhere might equally use the unique nature of person's internal body parts, such as their knobbly knees.

Internal body parts are obviously invisible to the unaided eye but Shamir and colleagues have now demonstrated that knee X-rays can be used for identification purposes. The approach rapidly analyses the X-ray images using the wnd-charm algorithm, which has previously been used to diagnose clinical conditions of the knee joints.

The advantage of using a biometric identification process based on this kind of imaging is that it would be so much more difficult for a fraudster to spoof the knees or other internal body part in the way that they might with artificial fingerprints or contact lenses.

The team points out that the algorithm can correctly identify a given pair of knees and match it to a specific individual in the database even if the original X-ray were taken several years earlier. Identifiable features correspond to specific persons, rather than the present clinical condition of the joint, the researchers say.

The Wnd-charm algorithm, which is publicly available, is a multi-purpose image classification method that looks at a large set of image features, including high-contrast features, textures, and the statistical distribution of pixels in the image.

The team used a dataset of 1700 X-ray images from 425 individuals, representing four knee joint images per person in the dataset. They digitized the X-rays as 8 megapixel scans and characterized a central area of 700 500 pixels for the joint detection algorithm to process.

They found that accuracy levels were yet not as high as iris detection or fingerprint identification with the current algorithm but are much better than random results. The algorithm might now be refined to improve accuracy considerably and an alternative imaging process such as terahertz imaging might also offer more precise data.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Inderscience Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Inderscience Publishers. "New Biometric ID: A Quick X-ray Snapshot Of A Person's Knees." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 March 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090325150611.htm>.
Inderscience Publishers. (2009, March 28). New Biometric ID: A Quick X-ray Snapshot Of A Person's Knees. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090325150611.htm
Inderscience Publishers. "New Biometric ID: A Quick X-ray Snapshot Of A Person's Knees." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090325150611.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Will Living Glue Be A Thing?

Will Living Glue Be A Thing?

Newsy (Sep. 23, 2014) Using proteins derived from mussels, engineers at MIT have made a supersticky underwater adhesive. They're now looking to make "living glue." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Company Copies Keys From Photos

Company Copies Keys From Photos

Newsy (Sep. 22, 2014) A new company allows customers to make copies of keys by simply uploading a couple of photos. But could it also be great for thieves? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Hyped-Up Big Bang Discovery Has A Dust Problem

The Hyped-Up Big Bang Discovery Has A Dust Problem

Newsy (Sep. 22, 2014) An analysis of new satellite data casts serious doubt on a previous study about the Big Bang that was once hailed as revolutionary. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Rockefeller Oil Heirs Switching To Clean Energy

Rockefeller Oil Heirs Switching To Clean Energy

Newsy (Sep. 22, 2014) The Rockefellers — heirs to an oil fortune that made the family name a symbol of American wealth — are switching from fossil fuels to clean energy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins