Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Alzheimer's Disease: New Small Molecule Approach To Treatment

Date:
April 18, 2009
Source:
University College London
Summary:
Scientists have identified a protein known as serum amyloid P component as a possible therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease.

New therapeutic approaches in Alzheimer's disease are urgently needed. Work led by Professor Mark Pepys FRS over more than 20 years has identified a protein known as serum amyloid P component (SAP) as a possible therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease. In collaboration with Roche he developed a new small molecule drug, CPHPC, which specifically targets SAP and removes it from the blood.

Related Articles


In the exciting new work reported now in the PNAS, the Pepys team together with Professor Martin Rossor and colleagues from the Dementia Research Centre of UCL's Institute of Neurology, have shown that the drug also removes SAP from the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

In this first study of the drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease, CPHPC was given to 5 individuals for 3 months. There was the usual depletion of SAP from the blood, seen in all subjects receiving this treatment, but also remarkable disappearance of SAP from the brain. Laboratory tests revealed the molecular mechanism responsible for this unique effect and also disclosed for the first time the way in which SAP accumulates in the brain in Alzheimer's disease.

Administration of CPHPC and the removal of SAP had no side effects in the patients with Alzheimer's disease. CPHPC has also been given for several years to patients with other diseases without any adverse effects. "The safety of CPHPC, together with the novel action of the drug in removing SAP from the brain, is very encouraging", said Professor Rossor.

Although the 3 month treatment period was too short to show any clinical benefit there was no obvious deterioration. Longer and larger scale clinical studies are being planned to confirm safety and seek evidence of benefit to the patients.

"The complete disappearance of SAP from the brain during treatment with CPHPC could not have been confidently predicted" said Professor Pepys, "and the drug, also to our surprise, entered the brain. Coupled with the absence of any side effects, these new findings strongly support further clinical studies to see whether longer term treatment with CPHPC protects against the inexorable mental decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease."

In December 2008 Roche divested CPHPC entirely to Pentraxin Therapeutics Ltd, a UCL spin out company founded by Professor Pepys. In February 2009 Pentraxin Therapeutics Ltd licensed CPHPC to GlaxoSmithKline for treatment of systemic amyloidosis, a rare fatal disease. Pentraxin retains the rights to CPHPC for all other indications.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University College London. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Simon E. Kolstoea, Basil H. Ridhab, Vittorio Bellottia, Nan Wangd, Carol V. Robinsond, Sebastian J. Crutchb, Geoffrey Keirc, Riitta Kukkastenvehmasb,, J. Ruth Gallimorea, Winston L. Hutchinsona, Philip N. Hawkinsa, Stephen P. Wooda, Martin N. Rossorb, Mark B. Pepysa. Molecular dissection of Alzheimer disease neuropathology by depletion of serum amyloid P component. PNAS, (in press)

Cite This Page:

University College London. "Alzheimer's Disease: New Small Molecule Approach To Treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090413180706.htm>.
University College London. (2009, April 18). Alzheimer's Disease: New Small Molecule Approach To Treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090413180706.htm
University College London. "Alzheimer's Disease: New Small Molecule Approach To Treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090413180706.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.S. Ebola Response Measures Demonstrated

U.S. Ebola Response Measures Demonstrated

AP (Oct. 31, 2014) Officials in the Washington area showed off Ebola response measures being taken at Dulles International Airport and the National Institutes of Health. (Oct. 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) NIAID Director Anthony Fauci said the risk of Ebola becoming an epidemic in the U.S. is essentially zero Thursday at the Washington Ideas Forum. He also said an Ebola vaccine will be tested in West Africa in the next few months. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) A nurse who vowed to defy Maine's voluntary quarantine for health care workers who treated Ebola patients followed through on her promise Thursday, leaving her home for an hour-long bike ride. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

AFP (Oct. 30, 2014) Colorado may have legalized marijuana for recreational use, but the debate around the decision still continues, with a recent - failed - attempt to ban cannabis-infused edibles. Duration: 01:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins