Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Snacking On High GI Foods During Late Pregnancy May Lead To The Birth Of A Heavier Baby With An Increased Risk Of Childhood Obesity

Date:
April 15, 2009
Source:
Dublin, University College
Summary:
Mothers who snack on high GI (Glycaemic Index) foods like chocolate and white bread during later pregnancy may give birth to heavier babies with a greater risk of childhood obesity, according to new research. The research into sheep models of pregnancy discovered that high GI snack diets among ewes during the third trimester of pregnancy resulted in a heavier birth weight and postnatal growth rate of newborn lambs. According to the scientists, the sheep model used in the scientific study is instructive of the relationship between a human mothers' diet, the birth weight of their child, and the risk of childhood obesity.

A young pregnant woman with a bowl of chocolate ice cream (and pickles).
Credit: iStockphoto/Ryan Ruffatti

Mothers who snack on high GI (Glycaemic Index) foods like chocolate and white bread during later pregnancy may give birth to heavier babies with a greater risk of childhood obesity, according to new research published in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Related Articles


The research by scientists from the UCD Conway Institute at University College Dublin, Ireland, and the National Maternity Hospital (NMH) in Dublin, Ireland, into sheep models of pregnancy discovered that high GI snack diets among ewes during the third trimester of pregnancy resulted in a heavier birth weight and postnatal growth rate of newborn lambs.

According to the scientists, the sheep model used in the scientific study is instructive of the relationship between a human mothers’ diet, the birth weight of their child, and the risk of childhood obesity. In previous scientific studies, the sheep model has been shown to share many elements of pregnancy with the human model including metabolic function and nutrient transport.

For the past 40 years, sheep models have been used to investigate maternal–fetal interactions in humans because sheep have a body weight of 65 to 85 kg, a 17 day (average) reproductive cycle, and they usually have 1 or 2 lambs per pregnancy with a relatively long gestation period of 147 days. Sheep models are also amenable to reproduction, nutritional and surgical manipulation and can tolerate observations like ultrasound and tissue collections such as blood sampling.

“For the first time, in a sheep model, the findings show that ewes fed high glycaemic foods twice daily in addition to their normal meals, during the last trimester of pregnancy, gave birth to heavier lambs with a faster postnatal growth rate,” says Professor Alex Evans, Associate Professor of Animal Physiology at the UCD School of Agriculture, Food and Veterinary Medicine, at University College Dublin, one of the co-authors of the study.

“Our findings show that maternal hyperglycaemia stimulates the production of insulin and suggest that this has a positive effect on fetal growth,” he explains. “Changing the source and pattern of intake of maternal dietary carbohydrate may help reduce maternal and fetal trauma at parturition and reduce the risk of obesity related diseases among offspring in later life.”

The new scientific research findings published in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology will prompt further investigations into the effects of high-glycaemic diets during pregnancy on the birth weight of children and the associated potential future risk of developing childhood obesity.

The Glycaemic Index (GI Index) is a scale of 0 – 100 which measures how a food raises blood glucose levels after it is eaten: dramatically, moderately or a little.

Higher GI values are given to foods that result in the most rapid rise in blood sugar once consumed. Many sweet and sugary foods have high GI but so too do starchy foods like potatoes and white bread. Glucose scores 100 on the GI Index, bananas score 52, and peanuts score 14. GIs of 70 or above are considered high, while GIs of 55 or below are considered low. Fish, pasta, milk, meat and most fruit and vegetables (except potatoes and watermelon) are low GI foods.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Dublin, University College. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Dublin, University College. "Snacking On High GI Foods During Late Pregnancy May Lead To The Birth Of A Heavier Baby With An Increased Risk Of Childhood Obesity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090414084625.htm>.
Dublin, University College. (2009, April 15). Snacking On High GI Foods During Late Pregnancy May Lead To The Birth Of A Heavier Baby With An Increased Risk Of Childhood Obesity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090414084625.htm
Dublin, University College. "Snacking On High GI Foods During Late Pregnancy May Lead To The Birth Of A Heavier Baby With An Increased Risk Of Childhood Obesity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090414084625.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Scientists in Amsterdam say couples transfer tens of millions of microbes when they kiss, encouraging healthy exposure to bacteria. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Cambridge scientists have unravelled the genetic code of a rare tapeworm that lived inside a patient's brain for at least four year. Researchers hope it will present new opportunities to diagnose and treat this invasive parasite. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins