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Too Much Sugar Is Bad, But Which Sugar Is Worse: Fructose Or Glucose?

Date:
April 25, 2009
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
In 2005, the average American consumed 64kg of added sugar, a sizeable proportion of which came through drinking soft drinks. Now, a 10-week study has provided evidence that human consumption of fructose-sweetened but not glucose-sweetened beverages can adversely affect both sensitivity to the hormone insulin and how the body handles fats, creating medical conditions that increase susceptibility to heart attack and stroke.

In 2005, the average American consumed 64kg of added sugar, a sizeable proportion of which came through drinking soft drinks. Now, in a 10-week study, Peter Havel and colleagues, at the University of California at Davis, Davis, have provided evidence that human consumption of fructose-sweetened but not glucose-sweetened beverages can adversely affect both sensitivity to the hormone insulin and how the body handles fats, creating medical conditions that increase susceptibility to heart attack and stroke.

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In the study, overweight and obese individuals consumed glucose- or fructose-sweetened beverages that provided 25% of their energy requirements for 10 weeks. During this period, individuals in both groups put on about the same amount of weight, but only those consuming fructose-sweetened beverages exhibited an increase in intraabdominal fat.

Further, only these individuals became less sensitive to the hormone insulin (which controls glucose levels in the blood) and showed signs of dyslipidemia (increased levels of fat-soluble molecules known as lipids in the blood).

As discussed in an accompanying commentary by Susanna Hofmann and Matthias Tschφp, although these are signs of the metabolic syndrome, which increases an individual's risk of heart attack, the long-term affects of fructose over-consumption on susceptibility to heart attack remain unknown.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Stanhope et al. Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2009; DOI: 10.1172/JCI37385

Cite This Page:

Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Too Much Sugar Is Bad, But Which Sugar Is Worse: Fructose Or Glucose?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090420182151.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2009, April 25). Too Much Sugar Is Bad, But Which Sugar Is Worse: Fructose Or Glucose?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090420182151.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Too Much Sugar Is Bad, But Which Sugar Is Worse: Fructose Or Glucose?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090420182151.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

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