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Researchers Find Medical Inpatients With Unhealthy Alcohol Use May Benefit From Brief Intervention

Date:
April 23, 2009
Source:
Boston University
Summary:
Researchers have found that some medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use may benefit from a brief intervention.

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found that some medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use may benefit from a brief intervention. The BUSM study appears in the May issue of Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

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"Brief intervention shows promise for increasing receipt of treatment among alcohol-dependent women, particularly those with higher cognitive functioning or an alcohol- attributable diagnosis," said lead author Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, FASAM, professor of medicine and epidemiology at BUSM and director of the Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit at Boston Medical Center. "The intervention also shows promise for younger men with dependence and for decreasing consumption among those with nondependent, unhealthy alcohol use."

Screening and brief intervention for all adults with unhealthy alcohol use is recommended. Brief intervention has proven efficacy in decreasing alcohol consumption and related consequences only in outpatients with unhealthy, but not dependent alcohol use. In the few inpatient studies on brief intervention, results were generally negative, making it likely that brief intervention has efficacy only in certain people and settings.

Of the 341 study participants, most had dependence and about half received motivational counseling sessions. Among subjects with nondependent, unhealthy alcohol use, brief intervention was significantly associated with fewer drinks per day and better physical health-related quality of life at three months. However, among those with dependence, intervention was associated with worse physical health-related quality of life and more hospital use and no changes in drinking. In adjusted analysis among those with and without dependence, brief intervention was not associated with mental health-related quality of life, alcohol problems or readiness to change.

Researchers further stated that contrary to their hypotheses; brief intervention had little effect on alcohol consumption. The dependent and nondependent groups had lower consumption at follow-up than at study entry. Factors other than, or in addition to, the brief intervention may have played a role in decreasing consumption, such as the subjects' medical illnesses, hospitalization and related services, natural history, regression to the mean, and a detailed research assessment of alcohol use that may have motivated change.

This study was funded by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. The National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism had no role in the design and conduct of the study, the collection, management, analysis and interpretation of the data, or the preparation, review and approval of the manuscript.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Boston University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Richard Saitz, Tibor P. Palfai, Debbie M. Cheng, Nicholas J. Horton, Kim Dukes, Kevin L. Kraemer, Mark S. Roberts, Rosanne T. Guerriero, Jeffrey H. Samet. Some Medical Inpatients With Unhealthy Alcohol Use May Benefit From Brief Intervention. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 2009; [link]

Cite This Page:

Boston University. "Researchers Find Medical Inpatients With Unhealthy Alcohol Use May Benefit From Brief Intervention." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423142517.htm>.
Boston University. (2009, April 23). Researchers Find Medical Inpatients With Unhealthy Alcohol Use May Benefit From Brief Intervention. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423142517.htm
Boston University. "Researchers Find Medical Inpatients With Unhealthy Alcohol Use May Benefit From Brief Intervention." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423142517.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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