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Understanding Stellar Explosions Is Less Straightforward Than Previously Thought

Date:
May 13, 2009
Source:
CNRS (Délégation Paris Michel-Ange)
Summary:
Stellar explosions called nova are caused by nuclear reactions between the star's atoms. In order to better understand such violent phenomena, astrophysicists study the radiation emitted by certain types of atom, and in particular the fluorine-18 produced by these reactions. Now, researchers have determined that fluorine-18 appears to be less abundant than expected. This discovery therefore reduces the chances of observing the radiation emitted by this atom.

Stellar explosions called novć are caused by nuclear reactions between the star's atoms. In order to better understand such violent phenomena, astrophysicists study the radiation emitted by certain types of atom, and in particular the fluorine-18 produced by these reactions. Now, researchers at GANIL (1) (CEA-CNRS (2)), in collaboration with teams from the UK, Belgium, Romania and France, have determined that fluorine-18 appears to be less abundant than expected.

This discovery therefore reduces the chances of observing the radiation emitted by this atom. It implies new constraints for the observation and understanding of novć.

Observed since ancient times, novć are stellar explosions which occur in our galaxy around 20 times a year. Today, physicists think that they take place in stellar binary systems, which are made up of two stars, a red giant and a small, hot companion called a white dwarf. "Matter is torn off the red giant and falls onto the surface of the white dwarf," explains François de Oliveira Santos, a physicist working at GANIL. "This stellar matter accumulates on the surface of the white dwarf, leading to an increase in its temperature and density. A number of nuclear reactions, transforming one or more atomic nuclei into other particles, then take place: stable atomic nuclei (carbon, oxygen, etc) in the star are transformed into radioactive nuclei, such as fluorine-18." It is by observing the radiation emitted by these particles that researchers hope to better understand the physical processes taking place during novć.

Fluorine-18 is a radioactive atom whose unstable nucleus is deficient in neutrons compared to its stable form, fluorine-19. When it disintegrates, fluorine-18 emits specific electromagnetic radiation that astrophysicists study in order to get a better understanding of what goes on inside novć. "The amount of radiation emitted during the explosion depends on the amount of fluorine-18 present," de Oliveira Santos explains. In order to show this, researchers have tried to identify all the nuclear reactions that lead to the creation and destruction of fluorine-18. Since these reactions depend on the structure of the nuclei, they have been studied with the use of particle accelerators.

An experiment carried out at Louvain-la-Neuve University in Belgium, as part of an international collaboration, has led scientists to revise downwards their estimate of the amount of fluorine-18 present in novae. The conclusion is that nuclear reactions involving fluorine-18 in these explosions lead to its destruction to a greater degree than had previously been estimated. "Our result is in agreement with recent theoretical work," de Oliveira Santos points out. "We obtained this result thanks to a new experimental technique that uses beams of accelerated radioactve nuclei." It leads to new constraints for the observation and understanding of stellar explosions.

(1) The French large heavy-ion accelerator located in Caen.

(2) CNRS/IN2P3:. CNRS's National Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by CNRS (Délégation Paris Michel-Ange). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Dalouzy, L. Achouri, M. Aliotta, C. Angulo, H. Benhabiles, C. Borcea, R. Borcea, P. Bourgault, A. Buta, A. Coc, A. Damman, T. Davinson, F. de Grancey, F. de Oliveira Santos, N. de Séréville, J. Kiener, M. G. Pellegriti, F. Negoita, A. M. Sánchez-Benítez, O. Sorlin, M. Stanoiu, I. Stefan, and P. J. Woods. Discovery of a New Broad Resonance in 19Ne Implications for the Destruction of the Cosmic -Ray Emitter 18F. Physical Review Letters, 24 April 2009

Cite This Page:

CNRS (Délégation Paris Michel-Ange). "Understanding Stellar Explosions Is Less Straightforward Than Previously Thought." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090430065820.htm>.
CNRS (Délégation Paris Michel-Ange). (2009, May 13). Understanding Stellar Explosions Is Less Straightforward Than Previously Thought. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090430065820.htm
CNRS (Délégation Paris Michel-Ange). "Understanding Stellar Explosions Is Less Straightforward Than Previously Thought." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090430065820.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

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