Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Snowboard Landing Pad Inspired By Accident

Date:
May 5, 2009
Source:
University of British Columbia
Summary:
A student has developed a ski and snowboard landing pad with the hopes of setting a new standard in safety for freestyle skiing and snowboarding.

Backside 360, unknown grab.
Credit: Image courtesy of Katal Innovations

A University of British Columbia student is unveiling the latest model of his ski and snowboard Landing Pad with the hopes of setting a new standard in safety for freestyle skiing and snowboarding.

After a 2005 snowboarding accident that left him a quadriplegic, Aaron Coret, a fourth-year UBC engineering student and snowboard enthusiast partnered with recent graduate Stephen Slen to develop a freestyle ski and snowboard safety device as part of their Integrated Engineering course work. The result is a patent-pending invention set to make its public debut at Lake Louise Ski Resort in Alberta the first week in May.

Unlike sports such as diving and gymnastics, freestyle snowboarding - where athletes do tricks as high as three to seven metre in the air - has no standardized training facilities that allow athletes to safely perfect their skills.

"One of the biggest threats to snowboarders' safety is landing on icy terrain while attempting new tricks," says Coret. "This is the risk we want to remove." Coret and Slen have created Katal Innovations to develop and market the Landing Pad.

What sets the duo's invention apart from existing safety devices that simply serve as a "giant pillow" is its unique design that simulates a perfectly shaped terrain park jump with a powder landing. Now in its third and largest iteration, at 15 metres by 27 metres in size, the Landing Pad features two independent air chambers to allow riders to continue movement downhill but cushions the fall in case the rider lands on anything other than their feet, making training safer.

"Over the past 20 years, snowboarding has evolved from a small group of riders crowded around early generation half-pipes to a mainstream industry with terrain parks at every resort, and a large following of people who are absolutely obsessed with it," says Coret. "Terrain parks at ski resorts are like a fantasy land for riders who crave the adrenaline rush of defying gravity while flying through the air upside down," says Coret. "But these jumps can deal out nasty consequences in less than perfect landing conditions."

"By creating a safer environment in which to learn new tricks, I hope to take some of the risk out of progressing this sport and continue to contribute to the sport I love so much," says Coret.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of British Columbia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of British Columbia. "Snowboard Landing Pad Inspired By Accident." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090503204418.htm>.
University of British Columbia. (2009, May 5). Snowboard Landing Pad Inspired By Accident. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090503204418.htm
University of British Columbia. "Snowboard Landing Pad Inspired By Accident." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090503204418.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

AP (July 18, 2014) The Obama administration approved the use of sonic cannons to discover deposits under the ocean floor by shooting sound waves 100 times louder than a jet engine through waters shared by endangered whales and turtles. (July 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Newsy (July 18, 2014) The wreckage of the German submarine U-166 has become clearly visible for the first time since it was discovered in 2001. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Reuters - US Online Video (July 17, 2014) President Barak Obama stopped by at a lunch counter in Delaware before making remarks about boosting the nation's infrastructure. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

TheStreet (July 16, 2014) Oil Futures are bouncing back after tumbling below $100 a barrel for the first time since May yesterday. Jeff Grossman is the president of BRG Brokerage and trades at the NYMEX. Grossman tells TheStreet the Middle East is always a concern for oil traders. Oil prices were pushed down in recent weeks on Libya increasing its production. Supply disruptions in Iraq fading also contributed to prices falling. News from China's economic front showing a growth for the second quarter also calmed fears on its slowdown. Jeff Grossman talks to TheStreet's Susannah Lee on this and more on the Energy Department's Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins