Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Multi-drug Resistant Gram-negative Rods Found In Two Philippine Neonatal Intensive Care Units

Date:
May 15, 2009
Source:
Boston University Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers have found a high frequency of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative rods in two of the largest neonatal intensive care units in the city of Manila, Philippines. Improved infection control methods could reduce the vast number of hospital acquired neonatal infections.

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found a high frequency of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative rods (GNRs) in two of the largest neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the city of Manila, Philippines. Improved infection control methods could reduce the vast number of hospital acquired neonatal infections.

According to researchers, hospital acquired infections have emerged as a significant health problem in developing areas. Neonatal mortality accounts for more than one third of all global child deaths each year. Sepsis is a leading cause of death within the first month of life and is often acquired through unhygienic care practices in healthcare facilities, which frequently have limited emphasis placed on standard infection control measures.

Over a 10-month period, BUSM researchers conducted studies for colonization and bloodstream infections with gentamicin or third generation cephalosporin-resistant GNR among all NICU infants weekly and then on the day of discharge. Researchers found a total of 1,997 resistant GNRs colonizing 1,831 neonates. Results also showed that 376 newborns became bacteremic with a total of 437 GNRs.

The most common GNR species identified were Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter. A high proportion of colonization and bacteremia at the two NICUs was with non-intestinal GNRs. Factors significantly associated with increased risk of bacteremia were mechanical ventilation and prematurity. Additionally, colonization with a resistant GNR was an independent risk factor for bacteremia.

"Colonization with a resistant GNR was an independent risk factor for sepsis," said senior author, Davidson Hamer, MD, associate professor of international health and medicine at Boston University School of Public Health, and director of Boston Medical Center's Travel Clinic. "The unusually high intensity of colonization pressure and disease with multidrug-resistant GNRs at these two NICUs constitutes an emerging health care crisis in the developing world."

The BUSM study appears online in the journal Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

This study was funded by the United States Agency for International Development, the Health Resources and Services Administration and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. These organizations had no role in the design and conduct of the study, the collection, management, analysis and interpretation of the data, or the preparation, review and approval of the manuscript.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Boston University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Boston University Medical Center. "Multi-drug Resistant Gram-negative Rods Found In Two Philippine Neonatal Intensive Care Units." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090515130709.htm>.
Boston University Medical Center. (2009, May 15). Multi-drug Resistant Gram-negative Rods Found In Two Philippine Neonatal Intensive Care Units. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 15, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090515130709.htm
Boston University Medical Center. "Multi-drug Resistant Gram-negative Rods Found In Two Philippine Neonatal Intensive Care Units." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090515130709.htm (accessed September 15, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 15, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Newsy (Sep. 14, 2014) The respiratory virus Enterovirus D68, which targets children, has spread from the Midwest to 21 states. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Newsy (Sep. 13, 2014) A U.K. survey found that journalists consumed the most amount of coffee, but that's only the tip of the coffee-related statistics iceberg. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Contagious Respiratory Illness Continues to Spread Across U.S.

Contagious Respiratory Illness Continues to Spread Across U.S.

Reuters - US Online Video (Sep. 12, 2014) Hundreds of children in several states have been stricken by a serious respiratory illness that is spreading across the U.S. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Batters Sierra Leone Economy Too

Ebola Batters Sierra Leone Economy Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 12, 2014) The World Health Organisation warns that local health workers in West Africa can't keep up with Ebola - and among those countries hardest hit by the outbreak, the economic damage is coming into focus, too. As David Pollard reports, Sierra Leone admits that growth in one of the poorest economies in the region is taking a beating. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins