Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cognitive Behavior Therapy Appears Beneficial For Long-term Treatment Of Insomnia

Date:
May 26, 2009
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
For patients with persistent insomnia, a combination of cognitive behavior therapy and the medication zolpidem for 6 weeks was associated with improvement in sleep, although for a longer treatment period CBT alone was more beneficial, according to a new study.

For patients with persistent insomnia, a combination of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and the medication zolpidem for 6 weeks was associated with improvement in sleep, although for a longer treatment period CBT alone was more beneficial, according to a new study.

Insomnia is a prevalent public health problem affecting large segments of the population on a situational, recurrent, or chronic basis. "Persistent insomnia is associated with significant impairments of daytime functioning, reduced quality of life, and when persistent insomnia is not treated, it heightens the risks for major depression and hypertension," the authors write. CBT and some sleep medications are effective for short-term treatment of insomnia, but few patients achieve complete remission with any single treatment. It has been unclear whether combined therapies would improve outcomes.

Charles M. Morin, Ph.D., of the Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada, and colleagues evaluated the short- and long-term effects of CBT, singly and combined with the medication zolpidem, for persistent insomnia, and compared treatment strategies to optimize long-term outcomes. The trial included 160 adults, who were randomized to receive either CBT alone or CBT plus 10 mg/d (taken at bedtime) of zolpidem for an initial 6-week therapy, followed by extended 6-month therapy. The CBT included recommendations on how to improve sleep and education regarding faulty beliefs and misconceptions about sleep.

The researchers found that CBT used singly or in combination with zolpidem produced significant improvements in the amount of time that it took to fall asleep, time awake after falling to sleep, and sleep efficiency during initial therapy. A larger increase of sleep time was obtained with the combined approach. After six weeks, the proportion of patients who responded to treatment of CBT alone (60 percent) or CBT plus zolpidem (61 percent) were similar, as were treatment remissions (39 percent for the CBT alone group; 44 percent for the CBT plus zolpidem group).

"The best long-term outcome was obtained with patients treated with combined therapy initially, followed by CBT alone, as evidenced by higher remission rates at the six-month follow-up compared with patients who continued to take zolpidem during extended therapy (68 percent vs. 42 percent)," the authors write.

"Although the present findings are promising, there is currently no treatment that works for every patient with insomnia and additional studies are needed to develop treatment algorithms to guide practitioners in the clinical management of insomnia."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Morin et al. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Singly and Combined With Medication, for Persistent Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association, 2009; 301 (19): 2005 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2009.682

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Cognitive Behavior Therapy Appears Beneficial For Long-term Treatment Of Insomnia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090519172107.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2009, May 26). Cognitive Behavior Therapy Appears Beneficial For Long-term Treatment Of Insomnia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090519172107.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Cognitive Behavior Therapy Appears Beneficial For Long-term Treatment Of Insomnia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090519172107.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Some Positive Ebola News: Outbreak 'Contained' In Nigeria

Some Positive Ebola News: Outbreak 'Contained' In Nigeria

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) The CDC says a new case of Ebola has not been reported in Nigeria for more than 21 days, leading to hopes the outbreak might be nearing its end. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN Ebola Mission Head: Immediate Action Is Crucial

UN Ebola Mission Head: Immediate Action Is Crucial

AFP (Sep. 30, 2014) The newly appointed head of the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER), Anthony Banbury, outlines operations to tackle the virus. Duration: 00:39 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Confirms First Case of Ebola in US

CDC Confirms First Case of Ebola in US

AP (Sep. 30, 2014) The CDC has confirmed the first diagnosed case of Ebola in the United States. The patient is being treated at a Dallas hospital after traveling earlier this month from Liberia. (Sept. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Breast Cancer Drug Extends Lives In Clinical Trial

New Breast Cancer Drug Extends Lives In Clinical Trial

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) In a clinical trial, breast cancer patients lived an average of 15 months longer when they received new drug Perjeta along with Herceptin. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins