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Surgery Proves Effective In Treating Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Date:
June 1, 2009
Source:
American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery
Summary:
Infants and young toddlers with obstructive sleep apnea and sleep disordered breathing experience significant improvement following surgical treatment of the ailment, according to a new study.
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FULL STORY

Infants and young toddlers with obstructive sleep apnea and sleep disordered breathing experience significant improvement following surgical treatment of the ailment, according to an invited article in the June 2009 issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

The study evaluated 73 cases in which children younger than two years old were treated for obstructive sleep apnea through the removal of the adenoids, tonsils, or both (adenotonsillectomy). Those treated through surgery experienced significant improvement on the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), an index that measures the severity of sleep apnea. Those treated medically, but not surgically, exhibited no improvement after treatment.

The study's authors also concluded that the rate and types of post-surgical complications were within acceptable levels.

Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in children, from infancy through puberty, while similar to adult sleep apnea, actually has different causes, consequences, and treatments. A child with SDB does not necessarily have this condition when they become an adult. The consequences of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea include snoring; sleep deprivation (which can cause moodiness and behavioral issues); abnormal urine production; slowed growth and development; and attention deficit and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Joseph S. Brigance, R. Christopher Miyamoto, Peter Schilt, Derek Houston, Jennifer L. Wiebke, Deborah Givan, Bruce H. Matt. Surgical management of obstructive sleep apnea in infants and young toddlers. Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 2009; 140 (6): 912 DOI: 10.1016/j.otohns.2009.01.034

Cite This Page:

American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery. "Surgery Proves Effective In Treating Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090601091928.htm>.
American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery. (2009, June 1). Surgery Proves Effective In Treating Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090601091928.htm
American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery. "Surgery Proves Effective In Treating Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090601091928.htm (accessed May 23, 2015).

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