Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Winter- And Spring-onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Have Worse 6 Month Outcomes Than Those With Summer Onset

Date:
June 12, 2009
Source:
European League Against Rheumatism
Summary:
When a patient's first symptoms of RA occur in winter, severity of RA (as measured by the modified Total Sharp Score, mTSS, assessment of erosion and joint space narrowing) was rated more severe at six months, compared to patients whose RA first became symptomatic in summer. Patients with first symptoms in spring showed poorer radiographic outcome compared to summer-onset patients.

When a patient's first symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) occur in winter, the severity of their RA (as measured by the modified Total Sharp Score, mTSS, an assessment of erosion and joint space narrowing) was rated more severe at six months, when compared to patients whose RA first became symptomatic in summer (Odds Ratio (OR) =2.82 [1.14;7], p=0.0255). Furthermore, RA patients with their first symptoms in spring showed poorer radiographic outcome compared to summer-onset patients (OR=2.83 [1.10;7.37], p=0.0322), according to the results of a new study presented June 12 at EULAR 2009, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Related Articles


Similarly, patients' mTSS after six months was worse if their first symptoms had occurred in winter (OR=2.61 [1.20; 5.71], p=0.0158) or in spring (OR=2.63 [1.13; 6.14], p=0.0025) versus autumn as the reference season. This effect was not however observed at 12 month follow up, which the study authors suggest could suggest that these initial environmental factors exert less of an effect on longer term radiographic progression.

Dr Gaël Mouterde, Immuno-Rheumatology Department, Lapeyronie Hospital, Montpellier, France who led the research, said: "During our study of predictors of radiographic progression, we have unveiled a distinct relationship between RA progression and seasonal onset and postulate that this could be as a result of either a vitamin D deficiency or environmental factors, such as winter viruses, influencing protein citrullination. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) are often found in the immune systems of RA patients. This finding may assist towards the identification of RA patients at a higher risk of developing structural damage, in order to propose early intensive therapy and minimise disease progression."

Of the 736 patients from the multicentre French ESPOIR cohort analysed in the study (48±12 years of age, females 77%, mean disease duration 103+/-53 days, DAS28 5.11±1.31, HAQ score 0.97±0.68, CRP 21.9±32 mg/l, HLA-DRB1*01 or 04 57.5%), those found to have anti-CCP antibodies (total n=290) were also likely to have experienced increased radiographic disease progression (defined by an increase of at least 1 point of the mTSS), than those without anti-CCP antibodies, both after six months (OR=3.73 [2.04;6.82], p<0.0001) and one year (OR=5.38 [3.01;9.65], p<0.0001) compared to those without these antibodies.

Patients presenting with synovitis (inflammation of the membrane that lines the joints, commonly seen in rheumatic diseases) of at least 2 joints for a duration of 6 weeks to 6 months were assessed at baseline in terms of: clinical and biological features of arthritis (including radiographs of hands, wrists and feet), HLA-DRB1 gene typing, socioeconomic factors, comorbidities, IgM RF and anti-CCP auto-antibodies. They were re-assessed at both 6 months and one year.

The sensitivity and specificity of rheumatic factor (RF, an auto-antibody or antibody directed against an individual's own tissues sometimes seen in patients with RA) and anti-CCP at baseline in discriminating between erosive and non erosive disease at 6 months and one year were determined. Optimal cutoffs for these tests were derived from receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves using a cost function. Logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between the radiological progression, and baseline variables.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European League Against Rheumatism. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European League Against Rheumatism. "Winter- And Spring-onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Have Worse 6 Month Outcomes Than Those With Summer Onset." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090612115421.htm>.
European League Against Rheumatism. (2009, June 12). Winter- And Spring-onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Have Worse 6 Month Outcomes Than Those With Summer Onset. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090612115421.htm
European League Against Rheumatism. "Winter- And Spring-onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Have Worse 6 Month Outcomes Than Those With Summer Onset." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090612115421.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) — Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins