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New Method For Detecting Nitroxyl Will Boost Cardiac Drug Research

Date:
August 3, 2009
Source:
Wake Forest University
Summary:
Scientists have developed a new research tool in the pursuit of heart medications based on the compound nitroxyl by identifying unique chemical markers for its presence in biological systems.

Wake Forest University scientists have developed a new research tool in the pursuit of heart medications based on the compound nitroxyl by identifying unique chemical markers for its presence in biological systems.

Nitroxyl, a cousin to the blood-vessel relaxing compound nitric oxide, has been shown in studies to strengthen canine heart beats, but research into its potential benefits for humans has been slowed by a lack of specific detection methods.

"I think this is a very powerful tool to help in the development of new drugs for congestive heart failure," said S. Bruce King, a professor of chemistry at Wake Forest who leads the team that conducted the research.

Researchers can generate nitroxyl from precursor chemicals under controlled conditions, but studying the molecule's activity in cells is difficult because its constituent elements—nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen—react so readily with other molecules. King's research team used compounds that are not present in normal cell biology to produce a reaction that yields the identifying chemical markers.

King has been investigating nitrogen oxide compounds at Wake Forest since 1995. While scientists have established that the human body naturally produces nitric oxide, natural production of nitroxyl is suspected but has not been demonstrated. King said the new chemical markers could help answer that question, as well.

King's research team has received support from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the American Heart Association and the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wake Forest University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Reisz et al. Reductive Phosphine-Mediated Ligation of Nitroxyl (HNO). Organic Letters, 2009; 11 (13): 2719 DOI: 10.1021/ol900914s

Cite This Page:

Wake Forest University. "New Method For Detecting Nitroxyl Will Boost Cardiac Drug Research." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090706090319.htm>.
Wake Forest University. (2009, August 3). New Method For Detecting Nitroxyl Will Boost Cardiac Drug Research. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090706090319.htm
Wake Forest University. "New Method For Detecting Nitroxyl Will Boost Cardiac Drug Research." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090706090319.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

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