Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Spot Urine Test: To Monitor Dietary Sodium Compliance In Liver Disease Patients?

Date:
August 12, 2009
Source:
World Journal of Gastroenterology
Summary:
Most patients with ascites caused by liver cirrhosis are treated with diuretics in addition to dietary sodium restriction. This creates a negative nitrogen balance and promotes mobilization of ascites. Lack of response can be secondary to noncompliance to salt restriction. The standard test to monitor compliance has been assessment of 24-h urinary sodium excretion. This can be difficult because it requires 24 h of urine collection by the patient.

Most patients with ascites caused by liver cirrhosis are treated with diuretics in addition to dietary sodium restriction. This creates a negative nitrogen balance and promotes mobilization of ascites. Lack of response can be secondary to noncompliance to salt restriction. The standard test to monitor compliance has been assessment of 24-h urinary sodium excretion. This can be difficult because it requires 24 h of urine collection by the patient.

A research article to be published on August 7 , 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. Study designed by Dr. El-Bokl and performed by Dr. Senousy and colleagues evaluated using spot urine Na/K ratio as an alternative. Forty patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites were admitted to Ain Shams University Hospital in Cairo, Egypt. The spot urine tests were compared to the standard 24-h urine collection test.

Results showed adequate accuracy for the spot urine test. Also, it had adequate sensitivity and specificity in identifying patients that were not compliant to the diet. Previous studies have been published as abstracts and showed similar results, however, the study performed by Dr. Senousy is considered to be the first full publication that explains the method of the study and research details.

Dietary sodium restriction is an important aspect in the treatment of ascites. Noncompliance can be misinterpreted as diuretic resistance, which can lead to unnecessary higher diuretic doses, or even using other forms of treatment like aspiration of ascitic fluid. The authors state that the new test is more practical compared to urine collection and it allows identification of patients that are noncompliant, for whom the next step should be diet education rather than increasing diuretic dose.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by World Journal of Gastroenterology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. El-Bokl MA, Senousy BE, El-Karmouty KZ, Mohammed IEK, Mohammed SM, Shabana SS, Shalaby H. Spot urinary sodium for assessing dietary sodium restriction in cirrhotic ascites. World J Gastroenterol, 2009; 15(29): 3631-3635 [link]

Cite This Page:

World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Spot Urine Test: To Monitor Dietary Sodium Compliance In Liver Disease Patients?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090812092140.htm>.
World Journal of Gastroenterology. (2009, August 12). Spot Urine Test: To Monitor Dietary Sodium Compliance In Liver Disease Patients?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090812092140.htm
World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Spot Urine Test: To Monitor Dietary Sodium Compliance In Liver Disease Patients?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090812092140.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins