Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Hope For Heart Failure Patients: Cardiac Resynchronization

Date:
September 1, 2009
Source:
University of Rochester Medical Center
Summary:
Patients who had a cardiac resynchronization device combined with a defibrillator implanted had a 34 percent reduction in their risk of death or heart failure when compared to patients receiving only an implanted cardiac defibrillator, according to a landmark study.

Patients who had a cardiac resynchronization device combined with a defibrillator (CRT-D) implanted had a 34 percent reduction in their risk of death or heart failure when compared to patients receiving only an implanted cardiac defibrillator (ICD), according to a landmark study published online in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented today at the European Society of Cardiology Congress (ESC) in Barcelona, Spain.

Related Articles


The overall benefit observed from resynchronization therapy was driven by a 41 percent reduction in heart failure. Women who received CRT-D had an "astonishing" 63 percent reduction in their risk of heart failure.

About one million cardiac patients in the United States die each year from either electrical, heart rhythm disorders that result in sudden cardiac death or from mechanical disorders where the heart's pumping ability is impaired (heart failure), according to the study authors.

In 2002, Arthur Moss, M.D., professor of Medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center, and the MADIT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial) research group showed that an implanted defibrillator, or ICD, reduced the risk of death by 31 percent in cardiac patients as part of the MADIT-II trial. This therapy was soon approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and became part of professional guidelines from the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology and the Heart Rhythm Society. Long-term follow-up studies showed, however, that ICDs were so effective at preventing sudden death that patients lived longer and were subsequently at increased risk for heart failure. This created an urgent need to better address both risks in tandem.

Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is currently approved for treatment only for patients with symptoms of severe heart failure (New York Heart Association [NYHA] class III and IV) in whom it reduces symptoms by improving the mechanical pumping action of the heart. Moss, also principal investigator of the current MADIT-CRT trial, and his team designed MADIT-CRT as follow-up to MADIT-II. The new trial sought to determine if preventive CRT-D therapy, the combination of an ICD with CRT, could reduce the risk of mortality and heart failure in patients with mild cardiac disease and few symptoms (NYHA class I or II).

Over a 4½ year period, 1820 patients from 110 medical centers in the United States, Canada, and Europe were enrolled and followed in MADIT-CRT. The trial was sponsored by Boston Scientific Corp. through a research grant to the University of Rochester. It is the world's largest randomized study involving NYHA class I and II patients. About 70 percent of the approximately 5.5 million Americans with some form of heart disease, or 3.9 million people, fall into NYHA class I or II.

"The findings from MADIT-CRT show that CRT-D effectively reduces the risk of heart failure," Moss said. "There is a very large population of patients with heart disease whom we believe will benefit from CRT-D therapy."

Prior to 2009, Moss received honoraria from Boston Scientific for talks at scientific programs. He holds no stock in any device company, has never been a member of any corporate speakers' bureau, and since Dec. 1, 2008, has chosen not to accept honoraria from Boston Scientific for any professional activity.

"This is a very important trial," said Richard Page, M.D., president of the Heart Rhythm Society. "Previous studies have shown that the ICD saves lives. This trial demonstrates that in this population, an ICD with biventricular pacing can be expected also to improve clinical outcome as measured by hospitalization for heart failure. I anticipate that these results may improve acceptance of ICD therapy, both by patients and their physicians, in that the patient would not only live longer, but also would live better."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Rochester Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Rochester Medical Center. "New Hope For Heart Failure Patients: Cardiac Resynchronization." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090901082412.htm>.
University of Rochester Medical Center. (2009, September 1). New Hope For Heart Failure Patients: Cardiac Resynchronization. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090901082412.htm
University of Rochester Medical Center. "New Hope For Heart Failure Patients: Cardiac Resynchronization." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090901082412.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

Newsy (Nov. 28, 2014) — WHO cites four studies that say Ebola can still be detected in semen up to 82 days after the onset of symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins