Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Using The Immune System To Reduce Prostate Cancer Risk

Date:
September 24, 2009
Source:
University of Michigan Health System
Summary:
Immune therapies have been explored as a way to treat cancer after it develops. But a new study suggests that genetic risk of prostate cancer can be reduced by rescuing critical immune system cells.

Immune therapies have been explored as a way to treat cancer after it develops. But a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center suggests that genetic risk of prostate cancer can be reduced by rescuing critical immune system cells.

The study was done in mice and would need further validation and extensive testing in the lab before being available for humans. But the results are promising for people with a strong family history of cancer or known cancer genes.

Typically, vaccines are based on specific antigens and trigger immunity for a specific pathogen. This is more challenging for cancer as the best lymphocytes that generate immunity to cancer are eliminated during development. In this new study, researchers sought to rescue these key lymphocytes – called high affinity cancer-reactive T cells – during their development.

The study appears online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The researchers first showed that T cells involved in prostate cancer are deleted because of a gene called lymphotoxin alpha. When the mice lacked lymphotoxin, these T cells came back. These mice become more resistant to prostate cancer. This result suggests that lymphotoxin can be a good target for immune prevention.

Next, the researchers injected a protein targeting lymphotoxin into cancer-susceptible mice. Without treatment, all of these mice will develop prostate cancer, and typically by age 6 months half of them will have metastatic cancer that has spread to distant organs. Although the treated mice still developed tumors, none developed metastases after 30 weeks.

“It appears that the rescued T cells delay tumor formation. It may not be that this approach can prevent cancer altogether, but it can delay the process and slow the aggressive growth and spread of cancer,” says study author Pan Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of surgery and pathology at the U-M Medical School.

While this study looked specifically at mice with prostate cancer, the approach has potential for other types of cancer.

“There is a certain population with a high likelihood of getting cancer, and we need better strategies to minimize their risk. This approach may be translated into clinical care for those patients,” Zheng says.

Prostate cancer statistics: 192,280 Americans will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year and 27,360 will die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

Additional authors include Penghui Zhou, Beth A. McNally, Lizhong Wang, Yang Liu, from U-M; Xiafeng Fang from the Chinese Academy of Science; and Ping Yu, Mingzhao Zhu, and Yang-Xin Fu, from the University of Chicago School of Medicine.

Funding was provided by the National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense Prostate Cancer Research Program.

Reference: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0905707106


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Michigan Health System. "Using The Immune System To Reduce Prostate Cancer Risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090923102402.htm>.
University of Michigan Health System. (2009, September 24). Using The Immune System To Reduce Prostate Cancer Risk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090923102402.htm
University of Michigan Health System. "Using The Immune System To Reduce Prostate Cancer Risk." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090923102402.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

WHO Calls for Ban on E-Cigarette Sales to Minors

WHO Calls for Ban on E-Cigarette Sales to Minors

AFP (Aug. 26, 2014) The World Health Organization called Tuesday on governments should ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors, warning that they pose a "serious threat" to foetuses and young people. Duration: 01:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Have You Ever Been 'Sleep Drunk?' 1 in 7 Has

Have You Ever Been 'Sleep Drunk?' 1 in 7 Has

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) A study published in the journal "Neurology" interviewed more than 19,000 people and found 15 percent suffer from being "sleep drunk." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Does Medical Marijuana Reduce Painkiller Overdose Deaths?

Does Medical Marijuana Reduce Painkiller Overdose Deaths?

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) A new study found fewer deaths from prescription drug overdoses in states that have legalized medical marijuana. But experts disagree on the results. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Official: British Ebola Sufferer Receiving Experimental Drug

Official: British Ebola Sufferer Receiving Experimental Drug

AFP (Aug. 26, 2014) A British nurse infected with Ebola while working in Sierra Leone is being given the same experimental drug used on two US missionaries who have recovered for the disease, doctors in London say. Duration: 00:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins