Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Lung Cancer Risk Increases With Expression Of Specific Genes

Date:
October 1, 2009
Source:
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
Summary:
A recent study determined that variations of specific genetic markers identified in previous research, or SNPs, may indicate a greater lung cancer risk in African Americans than in whites. The genes CHRNA3 and CHRNA5 may contribute to lung cancer risk due directly or through their association with nicotine dependence. Although their presence is less frequent in African-Americans, the risk for lung cancer may be greater when present.

A recent study published in the October 2009 issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology determined that variations of specific genetic markers identified in previous research, or SNPs, may indicate a greater lung cancer risk in African Americans than in whites. The genes CHRNA3 and CHRNA5 may contribute to lung cancer risk due directly or through their association with nicotine dependence. Although their presence is less frequent in African Americans, the risk for lung cancer may be greater when present.

Related Articles


Researchers from the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit, MI and the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX evaluated data on 1,508 non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) patients (38 percent of which were African American) selected from the Detroit SEER Cancer registry and 1,314 corresponding control patients matched based on age, gender and race. The three case-controlled studies examined family history of lung cancer, smoking history, and age. Using unconditional logistical regression, a type of statistical analysis, researchers identified associations between SNPs and lung cancer risk while controlling for age, sex and smoking behavior.

Despite reporting lower levels of smoking, lung cancer incidence remains higher for African Americans, than for whites, so this is an important population in which to study the role of CHRNA3 and CHRNA5 genes and risk of lung cancer.

Previous conclusions from the genome-wide associates studies (GWAS) identified associations between NSCLC risk, smoking behaviors and SNPs on the chromosome 15q25.1. The present study concentrated on the genes CHRNA3 and CHRNA5, confirming a stronger association with the risk of lung cancer than with nicotine dependence in African Americans.

"This research confirms that differences on a genetic level can alter our risks for lung cancer," said lead investigator Ann Schwartz. "This research extends the need for such discoveries across diverse populations."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. "Lung Cancer Risk Increases With Expression Of Specific Genes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 October 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091001081211.htm>.
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2009, October 1). Lung Cancer Risk Increases With Expression Of Specific Genes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091001081211.htm
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. "Lung Cancer Risk Increases With Expression Of Specific Genes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091001081211.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.S. Ebola Response Measures Demonstrated

U.S. Ebola Response Measures Demonstrated

AP (Oct. 31, 2014) Officials in the Washington area showed off Ebola response measures being taken at Dulles International Airport and the National Institutes of Health. (Oct. 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) NIAID Director Anthony Fauci said the risk of Ebola becoming an epidemic in the U.S. is essentially zero Thursday at the Washington Ideas Forum. He also said an Ebola vaccine will be tested in West Africa in the next few months. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) A nurse who vowed to defy Maine's voluntary quarantine for health care workers who treated Ebola patients followed through on her promise Thursday, leaving her home for an hour-long bike ride. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

AFP (Oct. 30, 2014) Colorado may have legalized marijuana for recreational use, but the debate around the decision still continues, with a recent - failed - attempt to ban cannabis-infused edibles. Duration: 01:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins